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BREAKING: Halladay Fan Still a Mystery

halladay tshirtRoy Halladay dropped into Phillies camp today, and I really wanted to ask him one question:

Did the guy in the Halladay t-shirt ever come forward?

Some background: Halladay on Jan. 11 tweeted a photo of himself at Busch Gardens, smiling and giving the thumbs up while standing behind a man in a red Halladay t-shirt. The man didn’t recognize him, so Halladay tweeted, “Oopps you missed me! Walked right by me! Hope he gets to see his pic with me on Twitter, he doesn’t know we took this.”

“Never showed up,” Halladay said. “The guy walked right by me. He stopped up at the rail and so I went up and my wife took the picture. I walked right in front of him and he had no clue, no clue.”

Halladay then mentioned a photo John Stamos posted recently on Instagram. Stamos stood in front of the “Full House” house with oblivious fans in the background.

“My wife is going, ‘Look what we started!” Halladay said with a smile.

Harang Improves, Expects to Start Thursday

Aaron HarangCliff Lee’s season and possibly career is in serious jeopardy, which makes Aaron Harang’s health an important issue.

He already has been scratched twice from starts because of back issues, but he threw a bullpen session this morning at Bright House Field and said he expects to start in a Grapefruit League game Thursday night against the Yankees in Tampa. Harang said he is confident he will have enough time to get ready for the2015 season.

“It’s frustrating, but it’s not as frustrating as if this was later in camp,” he said afterward. “I don’t view this as any type of setback. I can progress through and catch up with my innings pretty easily. It’s not that hard. I know exactly what I need to do.”

Harang missed his first start this spring because of “lower back discomfort.” Harang missed Saturday’s start in Lakeland, Fla., because of a spasm around the middle of his back.

“This was just muscular,” he said. “I woke up the other morning and just kind of moved around and grabbed on me for a second. It’s being precautious. There’s no reason to push this because you don’t want it to linger.”

Phillies Make Roster Moves

Jesse BiddleThe Phillies made their first round of roster moves this morning at Bright House Field.

There were no surprises.

They optioned left-hander Jesse Biddle, right-hander Adam Morgan, right-hander Ethan Martin and outfielder Aaron Altherr to Minor League camp. They reassigned right-hander Sean O’Sullivan and catcher John Hester to Minor League camp.

They released outfielder Xavier Paul.

Biddle, Morgan, Martin and Altherr need to pitch or play on a regular basis and getting limited work in big-league camp served them little benefit. The Phillies hope each can contribute at the big-league level in the near future.

The Phillies plan Biddle and Morgan to be in the rotation at some point. Martin is a bullpen candidate, although the Phillies have been preparing him to start this spring. Phillies director of player development Joe Jordan said over the winter that Altherr “is as good of an outfielder as we have in our system, and possibly in the Major Leagues as well.”

The rebuilding Phillies could use some young outfielders.

Altherr hit .286 with five doubles, two triples, four home runs, 27 RBIs and an .878 OPS in 105 at-bats with Aguilas de Zulia in the Venezuelan Winter League. It is a marked improvement from a disappointing season with Double-A Reading, where he hit .236 with 27 doubles, two triples, 14 home runs, 57 RBIs and a .686 OPS in 492 plate appearances.

“I just went out and had fun,” Altherr said, explaining his impressive play in Winter Ball. “I really didn’t think too much. Sometimes I just put too much pressure on myself during the (Minor League) season. I didn’t worry about anything in Winter Ball.”

O’Sullivan provides the organization starting pitching depth. Hester is recovering from knee surgery.

Paul no simply longer fit in the Phillies’ plans.

Lee, Harang Issues Leave Rotation in Flux

cliff lee magic eight ballCole Hamels will pitch tomorrow against the Orioles at Bright House Field, which puts him on a five-day schedule to start Opening Day.

Hamels as the Opening Day starter is a no-brainer.

But what about the other spots? Some remain up in the air because of health issues. Cliff Lee is trying beat the odds and pitch with a torn common flexor tendon in his left elbow. He did not throw today, but at this point, even if he can pitch with an injured elbow, it is highly unlikely he could be ready by early April.

“He said his arm felt pretty good,” Phillies pitching coach Bob McClure said. “He just doesn’t want to push it. That’s what he told me.”

Aaron Harang has been scratched twice this month because of “lower back discomfort,” but is scheduled to throw a bullpen session tomorrow. If that goes well, McClure said Harang will pitch Thursday against the Yankees.

“He said he can catch up,” McClure said.

Chad Billingsley threw a successful bullpen session today. He is recovering from a pair of elbow surgeries. The Phillies said he could be ready to join the rotation before the end of April.

“Exceptional,” McClure said about Billingsley’s bullpen. “You would never know he was hurt. It’s quality stuff. It really is.”

McClure said after two or three more live batting practice sessions Billingsley could pitch in a game.

Utley’s Ankle Is Better, But Not 100 Percent

Chase UtleyThe Phillies hope today  represented just another step in Chase Utley’s chances to be in the Opening Day lineup.

He played in his first Grapefruit League game today in a 2-1 victory over the Rays at Bright House Field. Utley has been slowly recovering from a sprained right ankle, which he suffered in January when he stepped on a baseball.

“It feels pretty good,” Utley said about the ankle. “Still making a little progress on it. It’s not perfect yet, but we’re moving in the right direction.”

Utley was a designated hitter for four innings, striking out swinging in the first inning and singling to right-center field in the fourth. Aaron Altherr pinch-ran for Utley, and Altherr scored on Ryan Howard’s two-run home run.

“It felt good to get out there in front of the crowd, get some at-bats off an opposing pitcher,” Utley said. “It was nice.”

“I thought Chase looked great,” Ryne Sandberg said. “I thought he laid off some pitches. His swing was good, with the base hit, and ran well.”

Of course, the next step is playing in the field. Sandberg and Utley offered no timetable for that.

“I think we have to talk about it,” Utley said. “I think there might be another DH in there, but yeah, I’d like to play the field soon.”

Lee’s Discomfort Remains, Harang Scratched

Cliff Lee, Aaron HarangA little more than three weeks before Opening Day the Phillies have some legitimate health questions about their rotation.

Cliff Lee threw again today, but said the discomfort in his left elbow remains. He is trying to pitch with a tear in the common flexor tendon, but if he cannot pitch season-ending surgery is the next option.

The Phillies scratched Aaron Harang from tomorrow’s start against the Tigers in Lakeland, Fla., because he has “lower back discomfort.” The Phillies said it is precautionary, and Harang is day to day.

“I’m not that concerned about it,” Ryne Sandberg said. “It’s a muscular thing that he has.”

This is the second time Harang has missed a start this spring because of his back. He pitched Monday against the Orioles and said his back felt fine.

Could DH come to NL? Gillick Hopes Not

Pat Gillick, Charlie Manuel, Rich DubeeCould the National League adopt the designated hitter in the near future?

The Collective Bargaining Agreement expires following the 2016 season, and MLBPA president Tony Clark said recently the idea has been mentioned to the union. It does not seem to be a pressing issue, but Phillies president Pat Gillick hopes the DH remains in the American League.

“There’s nothing imminent,” Clark said this morning at Bright House Field, where the union held its annual meeting with the Phillies. “There’s nothing going on. I don’t know how that snowball got rolling down hill. This wasn’t anything that’s been discussed. This was something that was mentioned elsewhere. At the end of the day we will go to the players and will determine – if it’s actually proposed — whether or not it’s a consideration the guys want to make, and then we’ll have our bargaining position.”

Scoring in baseball is down, so including the DH in the NL could boost offense. It also would create more high-paying jobs for veteran hitters.

“I’ve been in both leagues,” Gillick said. “Basically, I like the National League style of play. Some people might say, well, that’s an old guy’s way to look at it. But I think it’s a little more intellectual. I think one thing right now that’s pretty prominent is pace of game. And the American League, those New York games, those Boston games, they’re still probably playing them right now. They’re so long. The pace of game, which is an issue, the American League games are longer than the National League games.

“So I would not be one that would be a proponent of the DH in the National League.”

Told that the DH in the NL could increase scoring, Gillick said, “To be frank, I’d rather see them lower the mound and take some of the advantage away from the pitchers and try to improve scoring that way. I just like the intellectual game.”

Clark steered clear of saying whether or not the DH in the NL makes sense.

“There could be an argument for it. There could be an argument against it,” he said. “We’re not going to take a position one way or the other. I will tell you though that each time we’ve had a bargaining session, the DH has been a part of the conversation. What do you want to do? Do you want to eliminate it? Do you want to add it? So it’s been part of the conversation. But as I stand here today I haven’t even begun to ask guys, ‘Hey, what are you thinking about this?’”

Utley Could Play Friday

Chase UtleyChase Utley could play in his first Grapefruit League game tomorrow.

Ryne Sandberg said today that Utley could be the Phillies’ designated hitter against the Rays at Bright House Field. Utley has not played in a game this spring because of a sprained right ankle, which he injured in January when he stepped on a baseball. Utley’s ankle has made incremental progress over the past several weeks, and apparently he has made enough to step into the batter’s box and potentially run the bases.

Utley’s health is worth following. First, the Phillies desperately need his bat in the lineup. Second, he has a $15 million club option for next season that automatically vests with 500 plate appearances.

Hurry Up And Trade Hamels? Not So Fast

Cliff Lee, Cole Hamels, Roy HalladayShould the potentially career-ending tear in Cliff Lee’s left elbow push the Phillies into trading Cole Hamels sooner rather than later?

It makes sense. Getting something is better than getting nothing. Lee essentially is untradeable at this point, even if he finds a way to pitch this season. No team is going to give up a top prospect for a 36-year-old pitcher with continual flare ups in his elbow, especially one making $25 million this season with a $12.5 million buyout on a $27.5 million club option for 2016.

But imagine if something unfortunate happens to Hamels, who is healthy. The Phillies will have nothing to show for their most valuable asset.

Such a loss could cripple their rebuilding plans.

But while many are pointing to the pitchers that have dropped like flies this spring, the Phillies can point to two past examples why they should not trade Hamels before they are ready:

Curt Schilling in 2000 and Lee in 2009.

Schilling had been harshly and steadily criticizing the Phillies ownership and front office for some time. He had publicly demanded a trade. It was ugly. So the Phillies traded Schilling to Arizona on July 26, 2000, more than a year before he could become a free agent, for Travis Lee, Omar Daal, Nelson Figueroa and Vicente Padilla.

Former Phillies general manager Ed Wade told The Philadelphia Inquirer in Sept. 2007, that he regretted the deal.

“In retrospect, I would have held on to Schilling,” Wade said. “It would have been better if I ignored his trade demand one more time and run the risk of only getting draft picks” if he left following the 2001 season.

None of the four players the Phillies acquired for Schilling made a long term impact with the organization.

The Phillies traded Lee to Seattle for prospects Phillippe Aumont, Tyson Gillies and J.C. Ramirez, the same day they announced they acquired Roy Halladay from the Blue Jays in December 2009. The Phillies traded Lee, who was making an incredibly affordable $9 million in 2010, because former president David Montgomery told general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. he needed to replenish the farm system after trading seven top prospects to acquire Lee from the Indians in July 2009 and Halladay.

Amaro said he could not wait because he could not acquire Halladay one day then trade Lee a short time later.

He said it would have been a bad message to fans.

“If I made a mistake in that process, it was that I didn’t take the time to really maximize,” Amaro said in 2011 in “The Rotation.”

Aumont has struggled with the Phillies and it out of options. This spring is his last shot to make the team. Gillies and Ramirez are no longer with the organization.

So the Phillies are prepared to roll the dice and bet on Hamels not only staying healthy, but pitching like one of the best left-handers in baseball. It is a risk, but they have been rushed into trading aces before. They do not want to make the same mistake again.

“Look at the history of this era,” Amaro said last month. “There’s more Wild Card teams. There’s a lot more clubs with opportunities. You’ll see as many as 15 teams, half the league is kind of in the race well into the season. Everybody always needs pitching. There’s always a risk that somebody can get hurt. Somebody not getting the performance they want might change our circumstance.

“Again, if there were deals that we felt were appropriate for us to move forward then we would. So far some of the deals that we’ve discussed with some of our players have not yielded what we’ve wanted to do. And in some cases we feel like we’re better off staying with the players that we have for a variety of different reasons. We’ll move forward accordingly.”

Ryno Ball: Phillies Will Be Bunting

Ryne SandbergRyne Sandberg believes in small ball and he believes it is how the Phillies will score runs this season.

The Phillies bunted twice with runners in scoring position and no outs in today’s 3-2 victory over the Pirates at Bright House Field. It resulted in one run.

The Phillies have six sacrifice bunts this spring, which are four more than any other team.

“That’s something that I’m stressing this spring,” Sandberg said. “We’re working on it. We’re practicing it. If it’s not a bunt it could be a hit and run. Get a base runner, make something happen. Really to set the tone for the season.”

Sandberg explained that Cesar Hernandez’s sacrifice bunt in the first inning with Ben Revere on second and no outs, and Revere’s sacrifice bunt in the third with Tommy Joseph on second and Chase d’Arnaud on first with no outs were not sacrifice attempts.

“Early in the game sometimes that’s a bunt for a base hit,” Sandberg said. “If you’re out you’ve done a job advancing the runner. Early in the game that’s usually the case.”

Of course, analytics and critics argue that bunting makes less sense because outs are precious and the chances to score decrease dramatically with every out. But Sandberg cannot like what he has seen through nine Grapefruit League games. The Phillies finished the afternoon averaging 2.56 runs per game, which ranked 28th in baseball. Their .532 OPS ranked last.

“I look at our bats and our type of team and I think we’re going to have to be good at that game,” Sandberg said.

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