Results tagged ‘ Cole Hamels ’

Hamels: I Will Start Wednesday vs. Yankees

Hamels_IGCole Hamels cleaned out his locker yesterday to prank his teammates, but he made no jokes about his health today.

He said he is fine and he will pitch Wednesday against the Yankees in New York.

“I won’t be on the DL,” he said this afternoon at Citizens Bank Park.

The Phillies scratched Hamels from Friday night’s start against the Cardinals at Citizens Bank Park because of a strained right hamstring. But Hamels said he feels much better, and he said the Phillies scratched his start as “more of a precaution than anything.”

Hamels said he first felt something following Tuesday’s bullpen session.

“It felt like a cramp,” he said. “It was just tight.”

Hamels, who will throw a bullpen session Sunday to test the hamstring, is always in tune with how is body feels, so the fact he wanted to be cautious about his hamstring is no surprise. He certainly did not want to push the issue and tear something. Certainly not now. The July 31 Trade Deadline is just 42 days away. The last thing Hamels need is a serious injury.

But Hamels, who the Phillies are trying to trade, downplayed the proximity of the Trade Deadline to the way he handled the injury.

“My focus is to play on this team and win ballgames, and that’s what I’m trying to do,” he said. “I want to maintain the level of play that I know I’m capable of going out there and doing. And that’s not because of other situations, but it’s because that’s who I am. And what I’ve learned, in the past, with trying to push through certain injuries. There are times when you just want to be smart no matter what the circumstances are. I know they’re a little bit different than previous circumstances in previous years, but I’m not going to change the way I like to play the game and prepare for the game.”

But the Trade Deadline is on his mind. It is why he cleaned out his locker to get teammates and members of the media to think he had been traded during Thursday’s 2-1 victory over the Orioles.

“We’ve kind of bene battling some tough morale, so just something to distract everybody,” he said about the prank. “I think with a lot of them it worked. I think even today they didn’t know what to expect.”

“Cole, glad to see that trade didn’t go through,” closer Jonathan Papelbon said as he walked past Hamels.

Hamels Scratched from Friday’s Start

Cole HamelsThis isn’t the news the Phillies needed.

They announced this afternoon that Cole Hamels has been scratched from tomorrow night’s start against the Cardinals because of a mild right hamstring strain. Triple-A right-hander Phillippe Aumont will start in his place.

Hamels is 5-5 with a 2.96 ERA in 14 starts this season, but his health is critical as the July 31 Trade Deadline approaches. Phillies general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. said yesterday he is hopeful the Phillies can make some trades to speed up the team’s rebuilding process. Hamels is the team’s most valuable piece, so they must hope the injury does not linger and Hamels returns to the rotation shortly.

A roster move will be made prior to Friday’s game to accommodate Aumont on the 25-man and 40-man rosters.

Ryno: Small Ball Will Continue

Ryne SandbergRyne Sandberg promised the Phillies would play oodles of small ball in 2015.

He watched those efforts fail repeatedly last night in a 3-2 victory over the Nationals in 10 innings, but he remains as determined as ever to make it part of his team’s game.

The Phillies had runners on first and second with no outs in the third and fifth innings and twice tried to sacrifice bunt to advance their base runners. But Freddy Galvis bunted the ball back to the pitcher in the third and Ben Revere bunted the ball back to the pitcher in the fifth with the lead runner thrown out both times. (A batter earlier in the fifth, Cole Hamels reached base when he attempted to sacrifice a runner to second. He bunted the ball in front of the plate, but an errant throw to second allowed both runners to be safe.)

That’s 3-for-3 on bad bunts on a team that vowed bunting would be a big part of its game this season.

The Phillies also had a runner on second and no outs in the ninth, but Revere missed the sign to sacrifice bunt. He struck out swinging.

“We have to get the bunts down,” Sandberg said. “It’s a priority. We need to improve on that. We could have made it much easier on the offensive side of things with Cole out there on the mound and with the pitching we had.”

But the Phillies would have been better served swinging away in those situations … yes, even knowing the end result of Revere’s at-bat in the ninth. Baseball Prospectus’ Runs Expectations data from 2014 showed a team’s chances to score decreased when a team gave up an out to advance a runner.

Teams averaged 1.4023 runs with runners on first and second and no outs last season.

They averaged 1.2714 runs with runners on second and third and one out.

In other words, the Phillies had a 9.3 percent better chance to score with Galvis and Revere swinging away in the third and fifth innings. That might not seem like a lot, but every percentage point counts for a team that acknowledges it will struggle to score runs this season.

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(NOT) BREAKING: Hamels Is Opening Day Starter

Matt Cain,Ryne Sandberg smirked Thursday when asked about his Opening Day starter.

“It’s a secret,” he said.

Everybody in the world knew it would be Cole Hamels. It literally could be nobody else. But Sandberg made the obvious official Sunday afternoon at Bright House Field, where he anti-climatically announced Hamels is the guy.

“It’ll be Hamels and (Aaron) Harang to start the season, officially, in that order to start the year,” Sandberg said after a 4-4 tie with the Pirates.

Hamels will face the Red Sox on April 6 at Citizens Bank Park. It will be the second Opening Day start of his career.

Sandberg said the Phillies have not lined up anything beyond that, but David Buchanan and Jerome Williams will be the No. 3 and 4 starters.

The No. 5 starter is expected to be Sean O’Sullivan or Kevin Slowey with O’Sullivan, who is in Minor League camp, considered the favorite. The Phillies do not need a No. 5 starter until April 12, and the organization is hopeful Chad Billingsley will be able to join the rotation before the end of April.

Billingsley is recovering from a pair of right elbow surgeries.

But Hamels will pitch Opening Day. How long he remains in the Phillies’ rotation remains to be seen. He is available in a trade, but the Phillies have not found an offer they like.

Hurry Up And Trade Hamels? Not So Fast

Cliff Lee, Cole Hamels, Roy HalladayShould the potentially career-ending tear in Cliff Lee’s left elbow push the Phillies into trading Cole Hamels sooner rather than later?

It makes sense. Getting something is better than getting nothing. Lee essentially is untradeable at this point, even if he finds a way to pitch this season. No team is going to give up a top prospect for a 36-year-old pitcher with continual flare ups in his elbow, especially one making $25 million this season with a $12.5 million buyout on a $27.5 million club option for 2016.

But imagine if something unfortunate happens to Hamels, who is healthy. The Phillies will have nothing to show for their most valuable asset.

Such a loss could cripple their rebuilding plans.

But while many are pointing to the pitchers that have dropped like flies this spring, the Phillies can point to two past examples why they should not trade Hamels before they are ready:

Curt Schilling in 2000 and Lee in 2009.

Schilling had been harshly and steadily criticizing the Phillies ownership and front office for some time. He had publicly demanded a trade. It was ugly. So the Phillies traded Schilling to Arizona on July 26, 2000, more than a year before he could become a free agent, for Travis Lee, Omar Daal, Nelson Figueroa and Vicente Padilla.

Former Phillies general manager Ed Wade told The Philadelphia Inquirer in Sept. 2007, that he regretted the deal.

“In retrospect, I would have held on to Schilling,” Wade said. “It would have been better if I ignored his trade demand one more time and run the risk of only getting draft picks” if he left following the 2001 season.

None of the four players the Phillies acquired for Schilling made a long term impact with the organization.

The Phillies traded Lee to Seattle for prospects Phillippe Aumont, Tyson Gillies and J.C. Ramirez, the same day they announced they acquired Roy Halladay from the Blue Jays in December 2009. The Phillies traded Lee, who was making an incredibly affordable $9 million in 2010, because former president David Montgomery told general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. he needed to replenish the farm system after trading seven top prospects to acquire Lee from the Indians in July 2009 and Halladay.

Amaro said he could not wait because he could not acquire Halladay one day then trade Lee a short time later.

He said it would have been a bad message to fans.

“If I made a mistake in that process, it was that I didn’t take the time to really maximize,” Amaro said in 2011 in “The Rotation.”

Aumont has struggled with the Phillies and it out of options. This spring is his last shot to make the team. Gillies and Ramirez are no longer with the organization.

So the Phillies are prepared to roll the dice and bet on Hamels not only staying healthy, but pitching like one of the best left-handers in baseball. It is a risk, but they have been rushed into trading aces before. They do not want to make the same mistake again.

“Look at the history of this era,” Amaro said last month. “There’s more Wild Card teams. There’s a lot more clubs with opportunities. You’ll see as many as 15 teams, half the league is kind of in the race well into the season. Everybody always needs pitching. There’s always a risk that somebody can get hurt. Somebody not getting the performance they want might change our circumstance.

“Again, if there were deals that we felt were appropriate for us to move forward then we would. So far some of the deals that we’ve discussed with some of our players have not yielded what we’ve wanted to do. And in some cases we feel like we’re better off staying with the players that we have for a variety of different reasons. We’ll move forward accordingly.”

Are Ryno and Hamels on Different Pages?

Cole HamelsRyne Sandberg said yesterday he thinks the Phillies have a “chance to surprise some people.”

But then Cole Hamels told USA Today he wants to win and “I know it’s not going to happen here.”

It sounds like manager and pitcher are not on the same page. But Ruben Amaro Jr. and Sandberg said today they had no problem with Hamels’ comments. How could they? The Phillies front office has said the organization is rebuilding for the future and the process could take at least a couple seasons before the team can be a postseason contender.

“Maybe I would have liked for him to have chosen his words a little differently, but it’s totally understandable,” Amaro said Thursday. “Cole wants to win. I think everyone is on the same page. We all want to win.”

Sandberg said he spoke with Hamels about those words. He said Hamels told him that he made those comments “a while ago and it didn’t reflect on his feelings coming into camp. I think it was unfortunate timing and it wasn’t a reflection on how he feels coming into camp.”

USA Today’s Bob Nightengale wrote Wednesday’s story. He said he interviewed Hamels for the story Tuesday.

Perhaps Hamels completely changed his feelings from Tuesday to Thursday, when Phillies pitchers and catchers held their first workout at Carpenter Complex.

Perhaps Hamels simply does not want to ruffle any feathers.

But Hamels has said numerous times he does not want to spend his prime years on a losing team. He told USA Today his limited no-trade clause would not scuttle a trade to a contender.

“He’s one of those guys that sits in the sweet spot for us,” Amaro said about Hamels. “He’s going to be a tremendous asset if he stays with us, and if we get to the point where we move him, it’s going to be because we get assets back that are going to move us forward. He’s in our camp. I fully expect him to pitch on Opening Day for us. I’m glad to have him. He’s one of the best pitchers in the game and I’m happy to move forward with him and get us going back on track.”

Amaro said he has talked to veterans like Hamels, Jonathan Papelbon and Cliff Lee since they have arrived in camp. Each player has indicated in the past they would like to play for a winning team.

“There’s a lot of talk about us rebuilding and these (veterans) being disgruntled and all of that stuff,” Amaro said. “(But) these guys are all professionals, and they’re going to play and pitch and they’re going to do their best to win baseball games for the Phillies, I’m sure of that.”

Reports on Lee’s Elbow Good So Far

Cliff LeeIf the Phillies cannot trade Cole Hamels before Opening Day, they could have two aces to trade before the July 31 Trade Deadline.

Cliff Lee missed much of last season with an injured left elbow, but Ruben Amaro Jr. said last night that Lee has thrown three or four times off a mound recently without any issues. Amaro said Lee is expected to be ready to go when Spring Training opens next month.

That is significant because if Lee can stay healthy and pitch effectively, he could become a valuable trade chip come July.

“There’s plenty of teams out there that need pitching, especially when you talk about top of the rotation left-handers,” Amaro said. “They don’t fall off trees. I know there are going to be more than one or two contenders out there.”

The Demolition Begins

Rollins Gets MRI, Status TBD WednesdayIt is just a matter of time, but Phillies shortstop Jimmy Rollins is going to be traded to the Dodgers.

The demolition has begun.

Rollins is regarded as the greatest shortstop in franchise history, and he has the longest tenure of any professional athlete in the city. The Phillies selected him in the second round of the 1996 First-Year Player Draft. He made his big league debut in 2000, won the 2007 National League MVP Award, helped the Phillies win the 2008 World Series and set the franchise’s all-time hits record this season.

Rollins would be the first iconic player to fall in a potentially franchise-altering offseason. Cole Hamels, Chase Utley, Ryan Howard and others could be next in an extensive rebuilding project, although it is too early to tell. But multiple sources said Wednesday afternoon that the Phillies will trade Rollins to Los Angeles. The deal has not been finalized because a third team is involved in the trade, and money needs to be exchanged among them, which requires approval from the Commissioner’s Office.

“I know that there’s a lot of Jimmy Rollins stuff out there,” Phillies general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. said in the team’s hotel suite at the Winter Meetings. “There’s nothing to announce, and as I’ve said before, we’re keeping our options open and our minds open on any way that we can improve our club long term.”

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Lester Gone, Hamels Talks Heat Up

Cole HamelsPhillies general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. called Jon Lester the linchpin of the offseason.

Well, the pin has been pulled.

The Cubs and Lester have agreed to a six-year, $155 million contract, which means trade discussions regarding Cole Hamels are heating up. The Cubs, Red Sox and Dodgers had been most interested in Hamels, but with the Cubs out of the picture the attention turns to the Red Sox and Dodgers, who have the prospects and wherewithal to take the remaining four years and $96 million on Hamels’ deal.

(Hamels’ contract jumps to five years, $110 million if a 2019 club option automatically vests based on innings pitched.)

A source said the Giants also are taking a run at Hamels. They pursued Lester, but finished third in that sweepstakes.

Ryne Sandberg said yesterday the Phillies would have to be wowed to trade Hamels, which is true to an extent. They are not going to trade Hamels for a crop of mid-level prospects. They cannot make the same mistake they made in 2009, when they traded Cliff Lee to the Mariners for Phillippe Aumont, Tyson Gillies and J.C. Ramirez. The Phillies’ return for Hunter Pence, who they traded to San Francisco in 2012, also has been lackluster.

If the Phillies trade Hamels they have to hit big.

The Dodgers have a couple prospects the Phillies would love to have: infielder Corey Seager (No. 13 in MLB.com’s Top 100 Prospects list) and outfielder Joc Pederson (No. 15). They might be able to pry away one. A source indicated the Dodgers and Phillies could put together a bigger package to improve the Phillies’ return, and that package could include Jimmy Rollins.

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Heyward Trade, Martin Contract Could Affect Phillies

Cole Hamels, Carlos RuizTwo things happened yesterday that could affect the Phillies indirectly this offseason.

First, the Cardinals traded pitcher Shelby Miller and pitching prospect Tyrell Jenkins to the Braves for outfielder Jason Heyward and setup man Jordan Walden. Second, the Blue Jays signed catcher Russell Martin to a five-year, $82 million contract.

Everybody in baseball knows the Phillies are willing to trade anybody on their roster as they plan a significant rebuilding process. That includes left-hander Cole Hamels and catcher Carlos Ruiz, two of the five remaining pieces from the 2008 World Series championship roster.

The Phillies will trade Hamels only if they receive what they consider a legitimate return. (They are not looking to shed payroll here.) The Cardinals-Braves trade gives a rough outline for what the Phillies could request for Hamels. He is significantly more accomplished than Miller, although he also is owed $96 million over the next four seasons. Still, he could be viewed as an attractive alternative to free-agent aces like Max Scherzer and Jon Lester. The $96 million Hamels is owed certainly will be less than Lester and Scherzer will receive as free agents, although the teams that sign them will not have to give up prospects to get them.

(The team that signs Scherzer will lose a draft pick. The team that signs Lester will not.)

But if the Cardinals can acquire an everyday outfielder – albeit one that becomes a free agent next winter – and a setup man, the Phillies theoretically should be able to acquire more. That is not to say the Phillies will be looking exclusively at big-league talent for Hamels, but they at least will be looking for a blue-chip prospect or two, not a handful of fringe prospects that need a little luck to pan out.

The Cliff Lee-Seattle trade is on the minds of Phillies’ front office officials as they talk to teams about Hamels.

They cannot make the same mistake twice.

Now that Martin is off the market, teams needing a catcher are looking at a remarkably thin free-agent market. Teams serious about upgrading at catcher might have to make a trade to fill that need.

Ruiz is an option, although Arizona’s Miguel Montero is the hottest name at the moment. Ruiz is owed $17.5 million over the next two seasons. He is known as a good game caller (Roy Halladay loved the guy) and has been one of the most well liked and highly respected players in the Phillies clubhouse for years.

Ruiz hit .252 with 25 doubles, one triple, six home runs, 31 RBIs, a .347 on-base percentage and a .717 OPS last season. Ruiz and Montero each have a career .763 OPS.

The knock against Ruiz, 35, is that he has trouble staying healthy. He has spent time on the disabled list each of the previous six seasons.

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