Results tagged ‘ Cole Hamels ’

Nothing to See Here? Keep Moving?

Is there anything to worry about here?

Ruben Amaro Jr. said today left-hander Cole Hamels’ shoulder is fine. CSNPhilly.com reported Hamels had some shoulder soreness late in the 2012 season and early in the offseason. But the Phillies shut down Hamels’ throwing program for a couple weeks and has been fine since, Amaro said.

“We really weren’t concerned,” Amaro said. “If we were concerned or had any concern then he would have or would be seeing a doctor. We had none of that. If there are problems that come up in Spring Training then we’ll deal with them. But there is no indication that Cole has an issue right now.”

The Phillies hope so. Hamels, 29, signed a six-year, $144 million contract extension last summer and they need him healthy if they expect to return to the postseason in 2013.

Cloyd Gets His Shot

Cole Hamels is sick (gastrointestinal illness), so Tyler Cloyd will make his big-league debut tonight against the New York Mets at Citizens Bank Park.

Yes, it’s happening.

I’ve received countless tweets and e-mails for weeks asking about Cloyd and when the Phillies would give him a shot. Clearly, the Phillies weren’t in as big a rush to promote Cloyd as fans, who mostly only know him from his numbers. But they are impressive numbers. He is 12-1 with a 2.35 ERA in 22 starts this season with Triple-A Lehigh Valley. He has allowed 105 hits, 38 walks and struck out 93 in 142 innings. Cloyd does not have great stuff — his fastball is in the 85-89 mph range — but he has been good enough to be named the International League’s Most Valuable Pitcher.

It should be fun to watch tonight.

The Phillies will make a move to make room for Cloyd on the 25-man rosters before today’s game.

Shut Down Worley? Not In Phils’ Plans

Passing this along because I’ve been asked constantly about it …

Vance Worley is pitching with a bone chip in his right elbow and is 2-3 with a 5.73 ERA in eight starts since the end of June.

So, naturally, a lot of fans have been asking if the Phillies could shut down Worley the remainder of the season, despite the fact Worley maintains the injury is not a factor in his recent struggles. The school of thought is Worley could have a surgical procedure to remove the bone chips and begin his road to recovery sooner rather than later.

But the Phillies said there has been no discussion about that.

“My understanding is the issue isn’t going to take a whole offseason to recover from,” assistant general manager Scott Proefrock said. “As long as he can still pitch and there’s not a risk of him hurting himself … and from everything I understand there’s no issue there. He’s pitched some good games, he’s pitched some bad games. You’ve got to remember last year was his first time around. The second time around you’ve got to make adjustments. My impression is (Worley’s struggles) are not related to the issue.

“I haven’t been involved in any discussions whatsoever with shutting him down.”

One thing worth noting: Cole Hamels pitched with a bone chip last season, had surgery in the offseason and was throwing well before spring training started.

Hamels’ Deal

If you’re interested in such things, here’s the complete breakdown of Cole Hamels‘ six-year, $144 million contract extension:

  • 2013: $19.5 million
  • 2014: $22.5 million
  • 2015: $22.5 million
  • 2016: $22.5 million
  • 2017: $22.5 million
  • 2018: $22.5 million
  • 2019: $19 million club option or $6 million buyout or $24 million option that vests automatically if Hamels meets each of the following criteria: a) 400 innings pitched in 2017-2018; b) 200 innings pitched in 2018; c) he is not on the DL at end of 2018 with left shoulder or elbow injury.

Deal includes a $6 million signing bonus.

Bonuses: $50,000 All-Star; $100,000 World Series MVP; $50,000 League Championship Series MVP; $100,000 Cy Young ($50,000-2nd; $25,000-3rd); $50,000 Gold Glove; $50,000 Silver Slugger; $100,000 for MVP ($50,000-2nd; $25,000-3rd). Player may purchase four Diamond Club seats to all home regular-season and postseason games. Player may purchase suite for five home regular-season games per year. Player may purchase suite on road. Club will promote Hamels Foundation. Limited no-trade provision.

Rollins, Hamels and Other Reaction from Clubhouse

Here is what some Phillies said about today’s trades that sent Shane Victorino to Los Angeles and Hunter Pence to San Francisco:

JIMMY ROLLINS
How did you take the news?
Like you take anything. It’s nothing new. I’ve been through it before unfortunately.

But this year has been unexpected?
The results this year? The record?

Usually you’re bringing guys in?
At the end of the year Shane was going to be a free agent anyway, you know? We knew that his time here was over or they were going to work out something in the offseason. The season was going to dictate the length of his time here. Even if we were winning it wasn’t a guarantee he was going to be here. The writing was already on the wall that his tenure here may have been over.

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Hamels Agrees to 6-Year, $144 Million Deal

Cole Hamels isn’t going anywhere.

A source confirmed Wednesday morning the Phillies and Hamels have agreed to a six-year, $144 million contract.

Just a couple weeks ago it seemed like Hamels would be traded before Tuesday’s Trade Deadline because the Phillies could not afford to keep him through the season then lose him in free agency. But contract situations and negotiations in baseball turn quickly, and the Phillies made a big push in the past week to make something happen.

They knew they needed to make Hamels an offer he could not refuse, or he would take free agency.

That is exactly what this offer is.

The Phillies signed Roy Halladay to a three-year, $60 million extension when they acquired him from the Blue Jays in Dec. 2009. They signed Cliff Lee to a five-year, $120 million contract in Dec. 2010. This deal bests both of those. It also is the second-largest contract for a pitcher in baseball history, falling only behind the seven-year, $161 million deal CC Sabathia signed with the New York Yankees.

Here’s how the Hamels deal breaks down:

It will pay him $19.5 million next season and $22.5 million each season from 2014-18. The deal includes a $6 million signing bonus, plus a $20 million club option or a $24 million vesting option for 2019, when Hamels will be 35. The option vests automatically if three conditions are met: He does not finish the 2018 on the disabled list with a left shoulder or left elbow injury, he pitches 200 innings in 2018 and 400 innings in 2017-18. If the option does not vest or the Phillies decline to pick up the option Hamels receives a $6 million buyout.

Hamels, Lee, Rollins, Pence and More …

It sounds crazy, but today could be Cole Hamels‘ last start at Citizens Bank Park in a Phillies uniform.

I don’t think it will be, though.

If the Phillies are willing to offer Hamels six years, which they are, then they are likely willing to offer him the money he wants (or at least get very close to it). And if the Phillies make that effort and Hamels still says no, well, then he made their decision to trade him easy. If he says yes, then they have Roy Halladay, Cliff Lee and Hamels together through next season, and that’s not a bad thing.

A few thoughts on this:

  • If Hamels signs, what’s the plan? The Phillies could have more than $150 million committed to just 11 players for 2013: Lee ($25 million), Halladay ($20 million), Ryan Howard ($20 million), Chase Utley ($15 million), Jonathan Papelbon ($13 million), Jimmy Rollins ($11 million), Carlos Ruiz ($5 million), Kyle Kendrick ($4.5 million) and Laynce Nix ($1.35 million) are already signed. I’m not sure how Hamels’ deal will be structured, but let’s go with a projected AAV (average annual value) of $24 million per season. Hunter Pence, who is salary arbitration eligible for the final time, could earn around $14 million. That’s a ton of money for just 11 players. The luxury tax threshhold next season is $178 million. If the Phillies are willing to go well over the luxury tax (i.e. more than just a couple million or so) there’s no problem. But if they’re not then they have about $28 million to spend on the rest of the roster. Did we mention the holes on the roster next season could include center field, third base, left field (unless Domonic Brown becomes the guy) and a couple reliable bullpen pieces? Try adequately filling those holes (and completing the rest of the roster) for about $28 million.
  • That’s why you’re hearing names like Lee, Rollins and Pence mentioned in trade speculation. It’s the only thing that makes sense: the Phillies are considering clearing salary. But I’m not sure how moving any of those players makes them better next season, unless they would get a ridiculous score of prospects in return. Can’t you see a situation next July — assuming the Phillies are contenders — where they are looking to fill a hole they created by trading Lee, Rollins or Pence? I can. They’ve already done it. They traded Lee in Dec. 2009 and found themselves needing a starting pitcher in July 2010, thus shipping prospects to Houston for Roy Oswalt. Would they let history repeat itself?
  • I don’t trade Pence, unless I’m totally blown away with an offer. Why? Forget for a second his slow start with runners in scoring position. He’s still on pace for 29 home runs and 98 RBIs. If you trade Pence, who is going to be your right-handed power bat? Chooch? Carlos Ruiz is having a fantastic season, but he’s a 33-year-old catcher and he’s never hit like this before. It would be a tremendous leap of faith to enter 2013 believing he can do this again, and be the team’s primary power bat from the right side. The Phillies lost Jayson Werth following the 2010 season and bet on Ben Francisco. Francisco wasn’t up to the task, so the Phillies sent a bunch of prospects to Houston for Pence. Would they let history repeat itself?
  • If the Phillies trade Rollins it means they are going with Freddy Galvis at shortstop. OK, he’s brilliant defensively and he’s cheap. But they better have a good backup plan for Utley. They can’t enter 2013 saying, “We like our infield because we’ll finally have Utley and Howard healthy the entire year,” after Utley missed the first couple months each of the previous two seasons. If they don’t have a good backup plan they could be going with Galvis and Michael Martinez (or a Mike Fontenot comparable). And that just won’t work. Plus, consider for a second Rollins’ .729 OPS is seventh among 23 qualifying shortstops in baseball. Yes, he leads the big leagues in infield pop ups, but consider the alternatives.
  • The Phillies are 41-53 and 11 games behind the NL Wild Card leaders with eight teams ahead of them in the standings. Even if they sign Hamels to an extension, does it make any sense not to sell? I don’t think so, unless they go 7-1 or 8-0 before the deadline. Get what you can for what else you’ve got (other players still available to trade include Shane Victorino, Joe Blanton, Placido Polanco, Juan Pierre, etc.). You won’t get the haul you’ll get for Hamels, but you could get something that might help next season.

Halladay on Trade Deadline and Hamels

Roy Halladay rejoined the rotation last night in a 3-2 victory over the Dodgers.

Here is what he said after the game, commenting on his performance, the trade deadline and Cole Hamels‘ future with the Phillies:

Question: How did you feel?
Halladay: Good. I feel like each time it’s getting a little bit better. Consistency, there’s still some mechanical things that I just want to be able to repeat better. But I felt good. I think things were improved from the rehab start. Yeah, I want to go deeper, so once I get the pitch count up that’ll be nice. Overall, I was happy with pitch execution. I obviously felt good. That hasn’t been an issue since I’ve started throwing. It’s just a matter of repeating mechanics. I feel like it’s come along pretty well.

Question: Has this been tough to watch while you’ve been on the DL? Do you think you can help?
Halladay: One guy isn’t going to turn it around. I know they keep talking about Chase coming back and Ryan and me, but one guy’s not going to do it. We all need to chip in where we can. I think that’s important to look at it that way and realize that you’re not going to do it yourself. There’s not one guy that’s going to do it alone. It’s important to keep in mind. We need everybody. We’ve been playing better here. It’s positive for us so we want to keep that going as much as we can.

Question: Did you feel some urgency to come back because of the team’s situation?
Halladay: Yeah, but … it does and it doesn’t have to do with our situation. I want to get back and I want to help our team, but I think I would have felt that urgency one way or the other. Again, it’s being smart. I feel good and I feel like I can contribute. If I didn’t I wouldn’t have tried to pitch. If I felt like was going to go out there and be a detriment to the team I would have gone and pitched more. I feel like I can go out and be competitive, and give us a chance. Anybody who competes wants to be out there regardless. I don’t care if you’re 15 up in the standings or 15 down. You want to be out there and contribute. You definitely think about it, but I think I would have thought the same if we were up.

(more…)

What It Takes

Before the Phillies opened the second half of their season Friday in Colorado, what would you have said they needed to play in 15 games before the trade deadline to keep Cole Hamels, Shane Victorino and others?

I thought for a while they would need to finish 10-5, but the more I think about it the more I think it has to be better than that.

If they finish a very good 10-5 they’ll still be eight games under .500 entering the trade deadline. Is that good enough for Ruben Amaro Jr.? Should it be? If you’re looking at things with a cold and calculated eye it shouldn’t be. Entering tonight’s game at Dodger Stadium, the Phillies are 10 games out of the NL Wild Card with eight teams ahead of them in the standings. The Pirates, who currently hold the second Wild Card spot, are on pace to win 89 games. The Phillies need to finish 49-22 (.690) to win 89.

So say it’s July 30 or 31 and the Phillies are 10-5 since the break. They’re looking better. Roy Halladay has stabilized the rotation, taking pressure off the bullpen. Chase Utley and Ryan Howard look closer to form. They’re playing good, solid baseball. You start to think, “Boy, maybe these guys can get on a run.” But then you look at the standings and see the Phillies are 47-55, still way behind the Nationals in the NL East and something like seven or eight games behind the Wild Card leaders with seven teams ahead of them in the standings.

Then a team like the Rangers call.

Hey, Ruben. Listen, we thought about it and we’ll give you that package you want for Hamels. We’re just too close to winning the World Series not to go for it. What do you say?

What do you say? Do you say no on a long shot to win a Wild Card spot, which only guarantees one playoff game? Do you pass up on an opportunity to get younger and fill a few holes, like finding a power-hitting third baseman you sorely need?

These were the things running through my mind as I headed to the visitor’s clubhouse following last night’s 3-2 victory over the Dodgers. The victory gave the Phillies a three-game winning streak, their first winning streak of three or more games since May 23-26. It also was the first time since May 13 they won a game when scoring three or fewer runs.

Does 12-3 convince Amaro to stand pat? They’d still be four games under .500, and they still would need to play 40-20 (.667) the rest of the way to finish with 89 wins. But it’s a more difficult decision at that point. Fans will start getting excited again. They’ll start believing. But don’t you have to push through and make the trade anyway? If it’s the package you want I think you probably do. But it must be the package you want. No settling. You can’t get Vicente Padilla, Travis Lee, Omar Daal and Nelson Figueroa, like they got for Curt Schilling in 2000. They can’t get Placido Polanco, Bud Smith and Mike Timlin, like they got for Scott Rolen in 2002. They have to get the guys they want.

Tough call, isn’t it?

So what would it take for you not to sell?

Tell me what it takes to let you go

*

Jimmy Rollins played coy or simply did not want to answer my questions about waiving his trade rights.

Deep Thoughts …

Hola, amigos.

I’ve been laying low a few days, recharging the batteries and getting back to neutral after a long first half. But I’m back and it’s a gorgeous afternoon at Dodger Stadium. Things are good. Well, things are good except for the Phillies. They are 39-51, 14 games behind the Nationals and 11 games behind the Wild Card leaders — even after taking 2 of 3 from the Rockies this weekend.

I know a lot has been written about the next couple weeks, but I thought I’d offer my take.

In no particular order:

  • The Phillies will make their best offer to Cole Hamels soon. I expect him to reject it, unless he is absolutely blown away. What does that mean? Well, the Phillies signed Cliff Lee to a five-year, $120 million contract in Dec. 2010. If the Phillies offer Hamels five years, $125 million or five years, $130 million with some sort of sixth-year option or whatever, I don’t think that’s going to blow him away. I just don’t. Now, a seven year, $175 million offer might get the job done, but I’m not sure the Phillies will go that far. Hamels has said everything right over the past couple weeks. He says he wants to stay in Philadelphia. He says he trusts the organization will do everything it can to be competitive next season and beyond. But he also says this is one of the only times in his life he can discover his true value. Hamels is two or three months away from free agency. Really, why sign now?
  • If Hamels doesn’t sign I think the Phillies must trade him. I have read a lot of stories about how the new salary arbitration rules could hurt the Phillies’ chances of getting a big haul for him because a team won’t receive compensatory draft picks if he leaves after the season. I don’t believe that. Let’s look at the Rangers, for example. If the Rangers believe they are one piece away from winning a World Series, are they really going to hold up a deal because they don’t want to trade Double-A third baseman Mike Olt? He might be one of the best prospects in baseball, but at the moment he is just a prospect. Big teams have to roll the dice and take a shot. You play to win the World Series. The Phillies rolled the dice the past few seasons. They came up short, but at least they took a shot. Of course a team like the Pirates won’t give the Phillies what they want because they have no shot at signing Hamels following the season and they’re more than one piece away from winning the World Series. But a team like the Rangers or Angels? If push comes to shove I think somebody will put together an attractive package for Hamels.
  • The Phillies will take a PR hit for trading Hamels, but they shouldn’t let that influence their decision making. Bad PR today will be forgotten if they make a great trade and the Phillies make the playoffs next season. In the end, winning is the only thing that matters. Players come and go, no matter how much they are beloved. (I must say I think it’s a little funny how fans that criticized Hamels for being “soft” will be outraged if he is traded.) Feelings fade. Winning solves everything.
  • Better make a good trade, though. A repeat of the Lee trade to Seattle would be disastrous. DISASTROUS. They have to hit and hit big.
  • Are the Phillies definitely sellers? The Braves and Pirates lead the Wild Car race and are on pace for 90 wins. The Phillies would need to finish 51-21 (.708) to win 90 games. Impossible? No. Highly unlikely? Absolutely. At some point you have to look at things realistically. Sure, the Phillies might get hot, but even if they get hot and play .667 baseball the rest of the way they finish 87-75, which still would be short of the postseason. And then you’ll feel like a real sap if Hamels and others walk after the season.
  • Asking prices for Shane Victorino, Placido Polanco and others remain high as they should. Those prices could drop, but I don’t think the Phillies will give away those guys, either. That wouldn’t make sense for a few reasons: First, if a team only wants to give up a couple marginal prospects for Victorino, you might as well keep him, let him walk after the season and collect the draft picks. Second, they’re not compelled to trade them. They’re not in a salary dump situation. Third, the Phillies have nobody to play those positions the remainder of the season. I’m not sure the Phillies want to trade guys like Victorino and Polanco for nothing and have John Mayberry Jr. roaming center field and Ty Wigginton and Mike Fontenot manning third base.

That’s all for now.

Agree? Disagree?

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