Results tagged ‘ Cole Hamels ’

Dominicans Rock Hamels

Cole HamelsCole Hamels summed up his rocky 2 2/3 innings today against the Dominican Republic thusly:

“Thank goodness it doesn’t count.”

He allowed 12 hits, eight runs, one home run and struck out three in 2 2/3 innings against a talented lineup in a 15-2 loss at Bright House Field. The Dominicans scored four runs against Hamels in the second and four more in the third before he got pulled after throwing 59 pitches.

“Obviously, what I was going out and trying to do, I wasn’t able to accomplish it as well,” said Hamels, who is the Phillies’ presumed Opening Day starter. “They’re very good at what they do. It’s just a game where you take it and try to build on what you can for the next bullpen and then getting ready for my next goal, which is try to pitch deeper into a ballgame. Establish strikes in the strike zone, I don’t think I was doing that as well as I know I can. And on top of that, when I was throwing strikes, they were hitting them. Didn’t miss many bats.”

Said Phillies pitching coach Rich Dubee: “Spring Training has a purpose. One of the things is you’ve got to get your fastball going. He knows they’re all fastball hitters over there. But he sprinkled in (nine) cutters, some curveballs, I think he threw five curveballs, seven changeups. But he wants to get his fastball command going. And that’s the purpose today. It isn’t about results right now. … He’s facing an All-Star team and he doesn’t even have all his weapons.”

Halladay Endorses Hamels As Leader

Roy HalladayRoy Halladay isn’t starting Opening Day.

Gasp!

Much is made about the Opening Day starter, but the person who might care least about it is Halladay, who has started Opening Day each of the previous three seasons with the Phillies. Cole Hamels is expected to get the nod, although the Phillies have not made an official announcement.

“I think the commitment they made to him last year,” Halladay said referring to Hamels’ six-year, $144 million contract extension, “it’s his time. He’s been here for a long time, he’s had a lot of success here. There aren’t many teams where you have a World Series MVP and then you bring in four to five guys to pitch in front of him. It should have been his spot a long time ago. I think it’s something he’s going to embrace. And really after Opening Day, we’re all five days apart anyway.

“I talked to him about it when we’re going out and doing drills, stuff like that, it’s time for him now to kind of step up and take charge in those situations and establish himself as the head of the staff.”

That’s a pretty significant endorsement from a potential Hall of Famer.

Halladay has bigger fish to fry anyway. He is trying to bounce back from a disappointing 2012. So far he said everything has gone well. He has thrown to live hitters twice, and in each situation he has worked on improving his location.

“I feel good,” he said. “I feel good with where I’m at right now. There’s a long way to go in camp and there’s still a lot of things to accomplish but I’m happy with the way I feel and the way things are going. … I haven’t had a day where I’ve been sore from the core up. Those first couple of days, you’re going to be sore. Your legs will be sore from the drills and stuff, but from the core up I haven’t been sore and that’s a good sign. When you’re trying play catchup early in camp and you’re trying to keep your arm going, that’s the tough part of spring training. If you can avoid that that’s always a good sign, so I feel good going forward.”

Halladay makes his first Grapefruit League start Sunday against the Tigers in Lakeland. He said he will not be worried so much about the hitters as how he feels about his location and conditioning.

“You’re not really throwing your full arsenal,” he said. “What the hitters do isn’t so important to me now. I know what I’m looking for those first couple time outs and that’s my goal to go out and execute the pitches I want to execute and not be overly concerned with the swings and what have you.”

Hamels: I’m Fine, Ready to Go

Matt Cain,Cole Hamels gave a few Phillies fans a moment of panic earlier this month when word spread he suffered from a sore left shoulder late last season.

Hamels’ reaction when asked about it tonight?

“I don’t know of anything that happened,” he insisted. “I’ve been healthy. That’s the last thing on my list. … I haven’t felt anything of that sort. That’s the honest truth. I don’t know. I wasn’t the one that started it. I know I feel good and I’m ready to go. That’s all I can really answer. That’s kind of where it is. Same program, ready for Spring Training and finally getting out of the cold. That will be a lot nicer. I’m very excited.”

Ruben Amaro Jr. earlier this month addressed a report that said Hamels suffered from a sore shoulder. Amaro said the Phillies shut down Hamels’ throwing program for a couple weeks and has been fine since.

Amaro said the Phillies never considered it an issue, pointing out Hamels never visited a doctor. Hamels said the same thing. So while Hamels felt something in the shoulder in September he considered it typical soreness from the grind of the regular season and nothing more. That seems to be why there is a discrepancy in what Hamels said. Typically when a pitcher complains of shoulder soreness it means he cannot pitch, but Hamels apparently never felt that way.

If Hamels is fine that certainly is good news for the Phillies. Hamels, 29, signed a six-year, $144 million contract extension last summer and they need him healthy if they expect to return to the postseason in 2013.

Hamels said he planned to throw his fourth offseason bullpen session Wednesday. He plans to head to Clearwater, Fla., sometime next week.

Nothing to See Here? Keep Moving?

Is there anything to worry about here?

Ruben Amaro Jr. said today left-hander Cole Hamels’ shoulder is fine. CSNPhilly.com reported Hamels had some shoulder soreness late in the 2012 season and early in the offseason. But the Phillies shut down Hamels’ throwing program for a couple weeks and has been fine since, Amaro said.

“We really weren’t concerned,” Amaro said. “If we were concerned or had any concern then he would have or would be seeing a doctor. We had none of that. If there are problems that come up in Spring Training then we’ll deal with them. But there is no indication that Cole has an issue right now.”

The Phillies hope so. Hamels, 29, signed a six-year, $144 million contract extension last summer and they need him healthy if they expect to return to the postseason in 2013.

Cloyd Gets His Shot

Cole Hamels is sick (gastrointestinal illness), so Tyler Cloyd will make his big-league debut tonight against the New York Mets at Citizens Bank Park.

Yes, it’s happening.

I’ve received countless tweets and e-mails for weeks asking about Cloyd and when the Phillies would give him a shot. Clearly, the Phillies weren’t in as big a rush to promote Cloyd as fans, who mostly only know him from his numbers. But they are impressive numbers. He is 12-1 with a 2.35 ERA in 22 starts this season with Triple-A Lehigh Valley. He has allowed 105 hits, 38 walks and struck out 93 in 142 innings. Cloyd does not have great stuff — his fastball is in the 85-89 mph range — but he has been good enough to be named the International League’s Most Valuable Pitcher.

It should be fun to watch tonight.

The Phillies will make a move to make room for Cloyd on the 25-man rosters before today’s game.

Shut Down Worley? Not In Phils’ Plans

Passing this along because I’ve been asked constantly about it …

Vance Worley is pitching with a bone chip in his right elbow and is 2-3 with a 5.73 ERA in eight starts since the end of June.

So, naturally, a lot of fans have been asking if the Phillies could shut down Worley the remainder of the season, despite the fact Worley maintains the injury is not a factor in his recent struggles. The school of thought is Worley could have a surgical procedure to remove the bone chips and begin his road to recovery sooner rather than later.

But the Phillies said there has been no discussion about that.

“My understanding is the issue isn’t going to take a whole offseason to recover from,” assistant general manager Scott Proefrock said. “As long as he can still pitch and there’s not a risk of him hurting himself … and from everything I understand there’s no issue there. He’s pitched some good games, he’s pitched some bad games. You’ve got to remember last year was his first time around. The second time around you’ve got to make adjustments. My impression is (Worley’s struggles) are not related to the issue.

“I haven’t been involved in any discussions whatsoever with shutting him down.”

One thing worth noting: Cole Hamels pitched with a bone chip last season, had surgery in the offseason and was throwing well before spring training started.

Hamels’ Deal

If you’re interested in such things, here’s the complete breakdown of Cole Hamels‘ six-year, $144 million contract extension:

  • 2013: $19.5 million
  • 2014: $22.5 million
  • 2015: $22.5 million
  • 2016: $22.5 million
  • 2017: $22.5 million
  • 2018: $22.5 million
  • 2019: $19 million club option or $6 million buyout or $24 million option that vests automatically if Hamels meets each of the following criteria: a) 400 innings pitched in 2017-2018; b) 200 innings pitched in 2018; c) he is not on the DL at end of 2018 with left shoulder or elbow injury.

Deal includes a $6 million signing bonus.

Bonuses: $50,000 All-Star; $100,000 World Series MVP; $50,000 League Championship Series MVP; $100,000 Cy Young ($50,000-2nd; $25,000-3rd); $50,000 Gold Glove; $50,000 Silver Slugger; $100,000 for MVP ($50,000-2nd; $25,000-3rd). Player may purchase four Diamond Club seats to all home regular-season and postseason games. Player may purchase suite for five home regular-season games per year. Player may purchase suite on road. Club will promote Hamels Foundation. Limited no-trade provision.

Rollins, Hamels and Other Reaction from Clubhouse

Here is what some Phillies said about today’s trades that sent Shane Victorino to Los Angeles and Hunter Pence to San Francisco:

JIMMY ROLLINS
How did you take the news?
Like you take anything. It’s nothing new. I’ve been through it before unfortunately.

But this year has been unexpected?
The results this year? The record?

Usually you’re bringing guys in?
At the end of the year Shane was going to be a free agent anyway, you know? We knew that his time here was over or they were going to work out something in the offseason. The season was going to dictate the length of his time here. Even if we were winning it wasn’t a guarantee he was going to be here. The writing was already on the wall that his tenure here may have been over.

(more…)

Hamels Agrees to 6-Year, $144 Million Deal

Cole Hamels isn’t going anywhere.

A source confirmed Wednesday morning the Phillies and Hamels have agreed to a six-year, $144 million contract.

Just a couple weeks ago it seemed like Hamels would be traded before Tuesday’s Trade Deadline because the Phillies could not afford to keep him through the season then lose him in free agency. But contract situations and negotiations in baseball turn quickly, and the Phillies made a big push in the past week to make something happen.

They knew they needed to make Hamels an offer he could not refuse, or he would take free agency.

That is exactly what this offer is.

The Phillies signed Roy Halladay to a three-year, $60 million extension when they acquired him from the Blue Jays in Dec. 2009. They signed Cliff Lee to a five-year, $120 million contract in Dec. 2010. This deal bests both of those. It also is the second-largest contract for a pitcher in baseball history, falling only behind the seven-year, $161 million deal CC Sabathia signed with the New York Yankees.

Here’s how the Hamels deal breaks down:

It will pay him $19.5 million next season and $22.5 million each season from 2014-18. The deal includes a $6 million signing bonus, plus a $20 million club option or a $24 million vesting option for 2019, when Hamels will be 35. The option vests automatically if three conditions are met: He does not finish the 2018 on the disabled list with a left shoulder or left elbow injury, he pitches 200 innings in 2018 and 400 innings in 2017-18. If the option does not vest or the Phillies decline to pick up the option Hamels receives a $6 million buyout.

Hamels, Lee, Rollins, Pence and More …

It sounds crazy, but today could be Cole Hamels‘ last start at Citizens Bank Park in a Phillies uniform.

I don’t think it will be, though.

If the Phillies are willing to offer Hamels six years, which they are, then they are likely willing to offer him the money he wants (or at least get very close to it). And if the Phillies make that effort and Hamels still says no, well, then he made their decision to trade him easy. If he says yes, then they have Roy Halladay, Cliff Lee and Hamels together through next season, and that’s not a bad thing.

A few thoughts on this:

  • If Hamels signs, what’s the plan? The Phillies could have more than $150 million committed to just 11 players for 2013: Lee ($25 million), Halladay ($20 million), Ryan Howard ($20 million), Chase Utley ($15 million), Jonathan Papelbon ($13 million), Jimmy Rollins ($11 million), Carlos Ruiz ($5 million), Kyle Kendrick ($4.5 million) and Laynce Nix ($1.35 million) are already signed. I’m not sure how Hamels’ deal will be structured, but let’s go with a projected AAV (average annual value) of $24 million per season. Hunter Pence, who is salary arbitration eligible for the final time, could earn around $14 million. That’s a ton of money for just 11 players. The luxury tax threshhold next season is $178 million. If the Phillies are willing to go well over the luxury tax (i.e. more than just a couple million or so) there’s no problem. But if they’re not then they have about $28 million to spend on the rest of the roster. Did we mention the holes on the roster next season could include center field, third base, left field (unless Domonic Brown becomes the guy) and a couple reliable bullpen pieces? Try adequately filling those holes (and completing the rest of the roster) for about $28 million.
  • That’s why you’re hearing names like Lee, Rollins and Pence mentioned in trade speculation. It’s the only thing that makes sense: the Phillies are considering clearing salary. But I’m not sure how moving any of those players makes them better next season, unless they would get a ridiculous score of prospects in return. Can’t you see a situation next July — assuming the Phillies are contenders — where they are looking to fill a hole they created by trading Lee, Rollins or Pence? I can. They’ve already done it. They traded Lee in Dec. 2009 and found themselves needing a starting pitcher in July 2010, thus shipping prospects to Houston for Roy Oswalt. Would they let history repeat itself?
  • I don’t trade Pence, unless I’m totally blown away with an offer. Why? Forget for a second his slow start with runners in scoring position. He’s still on pace for 29 home runs and 98 RBIs. If you trade Pence, who is going to be your right-handed power bat? Chooch? Carlos Ruiz is having a fantastic season, but he’s a 33-year-old catcher and he’s never hit like this before. It would be a tremendous leap of faith to enter 2013 believing he can do this again, and be the team’s primary power bat from the right side. The Phillies lost Jayson Werth following the 2010 season and bet on Ben Francisco. Francisco wasn’t up to the task, so the Phillies sent a bunch of prospects to Houston for Pence. Would they let history repeat itself?
  • If the Phillies trade Rollins it means they are going with Freddy Galvis at shortstop. OK, he’s brilliant defensively and he’s cheap. But they better have a good backup plan for Utley. They can’t enter 2013 saying, “We like our infield because we’ll finally have Utley and Howard healthy the entire year,” after Utley missed the first couple months each of the previous two seasons. If they don’t have a good backup plan they could be going with Galvis and Michael Martinez (or a Mike Fontenot comparable). And that just won’t work. Plus, consider for a second Rollins’ .729 OPS is seventh among 23 qualifying shortstops in baseball. Yes, he leads the big leagues in infield pop ups, but consider the alternatives.
  • The Phillies are 41-53 and 11 games behind the NL Wild Card leaders with eight teams ahead of them in the standings. Even if they sign Hamels to an extension, does it make any sense not to sell? I don’t think so, unless they go 7-1 or 8-0 before the deadline. Get what you can for what else you’ve got (other players still available to trade include Shane Victorino, Joe Blanton, Placido Polanco, Juan Pierre, etc.). You won’t get the haul you’ll get for Hamels, but you could get something that might help next season.
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