Results tagged ‘ Jimmy Rollins ’

J-Roll Talks Sandberg, Middleton, Utley and More

rollinsJimmy Rollins is not feeling especially nostalgic this week at Dodger Stadium.

The Phillies are in town, but they traded him to the Dodgers in December. So those warm and fuzzy feelings about facing his former team?

“I haven’t thought about it, honestly,” Rollins said Monday. “There’s enough going on around here to keep me occupied. It’ll be good to see the guys. Obviously I’ve texted a few of them. A few of them return them right away, some wait a week or two. But, other than that, it’s another baseball game, honestly. Going there will probably be different, but coming here, they’re the team we want to beat.”

Rollins said he is not following his former team too closely, but he certainly knows the Phillies have the worst record in baseball.

“I’m glad to have gotten out when I did,” Rollins said. “But I’m glad to have gotten here. Ruben (Amaro Jr.) and I spoke of where I wanted to go. I said Los Angeles, and they were able to get a deal done. So that helps, it helps a whole bunch, when you go somewhere you want to go if you have to leave as opposed to just wherever you end up.”

Rollins touched on number topics Monday:

Ryne Sandberg quitting midseason. “When you’re not winning things happen like that. It’s unfortunate that had to happen that way, no one wants to see a manager get halfway through the season and walk away for any reason other than health issues, but that wasn’t the case. Pete Mackanin, who is a jokester, he’s probably changed the clubhouse over there a little bit.”

Owner John Middleton, who emerged as a face of the organization last week. “He’s a great man. I enjoyed John. Obviously you guys know his fire and his passion. And all he wants to do is win. I’ve always said if there can be another (George) Steinbrenner, it’ll probably be him. He wants to do whatever it takes to win. Him stepping forward doesn’t surprise (me). I think it’s a place where he’s always wanted to be. But with the group over there, I think they need to vote on those things. So when they’ve given him the nod, or if he’s been given the nod, he’ll be front and center doing what he needs to do to make the team better.”

On Chase Utley’s struggles. “I text Chase. He’s one of the guys that hits you back in a couple of weeks. He’s sounds like he’s in good spirits. Obviously what’s happened on the field, no one has expected that. No one is going to be pleased with that, especially Chase. You know how hard he goes at it and what he expects of himself. I know he’s had to deal with a few injuries. But we also know Chase, unless something is going to fall off, he’s not going to say much, he’s going to try to play through it. Starting with his ankle, it’s hard to hit on one foot. We saw that for a few years with Ryan (Howard), now Chase is going through the same thing. Other than that, Chase seems to be the same old guy when we text. Talking about LA traffic, where I’m living, things like that.”

On being anxious for his return to Philly next month: “No. You guys know me. I’m not really anxious to do anything. It’s one day at a time, and whoever’s in front of us is who we play that night. Whatever’s going to happen, what it’s going to be like, as the time draws near, I’ll probably be more excited about it. I know I have a lot of family members going up there. My mom and dad. My mom. Gigi, said, ‘We’re coming up for that game.’ That’s going to be fun. It’s a place I spent my whole career with the exception of this year. I was there since I was 17 in the organization. It will be fun and exciting.”

On if he’s surprised the Phillies are this bad. “There’s enough here to think about, going every day here, to concern myself with (it), honestly. Pat Gillick said they wouldn’t be a competitive team for a couple of years. I know when we were there he said that and we did our best to prove him wrong and the next year we were right there in the playoffs, finally broke through two years later won a championship. I remember him saying that. I thought he was up to his old tricks again, inspiring the boys. That hasn’t happened so far. Maybe he was right. Maybe he was being honest that with what they have and what they are going to eventually have in the farm system, they might not be competitive for a couple years.”

On Cole Hamels possibly being traded to the Dodgers. “That would be nice. That would be nice. Cole would be close to home. We know what type of pitcher he is, especially in big games. He wants those games. You have two big-game pitchers that are already here, so that would be three, and that’s one heck of a combination.”

On if he plans to play next year and beyond. “Yeah. I’ve just got to hit a little better. That’s it. The other parts are there. The second half I have to go out there and prove that I can still swing the bat.”

Rollins Trade Looking Good for Phillies

eflinThe Phillies only truly began their rebuilding process in December, when they traded Jimmy Rollins to the Dodgers for a pair of Minor League pitchers.

The move proved symbolic because the organization finally cut ties with one of its iconic players.

“It absolutely was the right thing for us to do,” Ruben Amaro Jr. said yesterday at Turner Field. “We’ll continue to try to do those types of deals that’ll help bring some talent into our system and afford opportunities for young players like Freddy Galvis, Cesar Hernandez and Maikel Franco.”

The early returns for the Phillies are positive. Rollins entered tonight’s series opener against the Phillies at Dodgers Stadium hitting .208 with 10 doubles, one triple, seven home runs, 24 RBIs and a .585 OPS, which ranked 161st out of 164 qualified hitters in baseball. Meanwhile, Double-A Reading right-hander Zach Eflin, whom they acquired in the deal, is 5-4 with a 2.88 ERA in 14 starts. Reading left-hander Tom Windle, whom they also acquired, just moved to the bullpen after struggling as a starter, but the Phillies think his arm will play big there.

“We’re very pleased. I’m very happy with it,” Amaro said. “Eflin has a chance to be one of, if not the best, one of the best pitching prospects we have in our organization. Right now, (Aaron) Nola is the guy that people are focusing on, but Eflin has a chance to have every bit as high a ceiling.

“Windle has a strong arm. His command wasn’t really good enough to be a starter at this stage of his career, but we think throwing him in the pen gives him a faster track to the big leagues. There’s great value in those guys that can throw in the mid to upper 90s from the left side.”

Nola remains the closest pitching prospect to the big leagues, especially with the rotation consistently struggling to pitch six innings. It would not be a surprise to see him with the Phillies before the end of the month.

“He’s close,” Amaro said. “He’s still working on some things. He struggled through a couple of games. He hasn’t necessarily been knocked around, but it hasn’t been easy for him. He’s still learning some things and dealing with more veteran hitters in Triple-A, which is a good test for him. I don’t think he’s that far away, but when he’s ready he’ll be here. Just because our rotation is very poor right now it doesn’t mean we’re going to bring him to the big leagues for that reason. We’re going to bring him when it’s time for him developmentally.”

Galvis Gets His Shot, But Is He Ready?

Freddy GalvisFreddy Galvis swears he cannot remember the moment he heard the Phillies traded Jimmy Rollins.

Funny, it would seem to be a momentous occasion.

Because when the Phillies traded Rollins to the Dodgers in December for Minor League pitchers Zach Eflin and Tom Windle, Galvis became the organization’s first everyday shortstop other than Rollins since Desi Relaford in 2000. It is a role Rollins held from 2001-14, when he became the greatest shortstop in franchise history and surpassed Mike Schmidt to become the franchise’s hits leader.

No pressure, Freddy.

“Jimmy was Jimmy,” Galvis said. “Jimmy was the man here in Philadelphia. But you have to come here and play baseball. I have to do my game. I don’t have to do Jimmy’s game. I have to do Freddy Galvis’ game and play ball.”

But what kind of game can Galvis bring?

He is fine defensive shortstop, so the pitchers should appreciate him. Ryne Sandberg loves his energy and praises his instincts. But a good glove, enthusiasm and instincts cannot help a hitter at the plate. Galvis has hit a combined .218 with a .621 OPS in 550 plate appearances with the Phillies from 2012-14. He has hit a combined .253 with a .646 OPS in eight Minor League seasons.

Galvis, 25, just hit .250 with 12 doubles, one triple, one home run, 18 RBIs and a .652 OPS in 51 games in Winter Ball in Venezuela.

The Phillies probably would take similar production from Galvis in 2015.

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The Demolition Begins

Rollins Gets MRI, Status TBD WednesdayIt is just a matter of time, but Phillies shortstop Jimmy Rollins is going to be traded to the Dodgers.

The demolition has begun.

Rollins is regarded as the greatest shortstop in franchise history, and he has the longest tenure of any professional athlete in the city. The Phillies selected him in the second round of the 1996 First-Year Player Draft. He made his big league debut in 2000, won the 2007 National League MVP Award, helped the Phillies win the 2008 World Series and set the franchise’s all-time hits record this season.

Rollins would be the first iconic player to fall in a potentially franchise-altering offseason. Cole Hamels, Chase Utley, Ryan Howard and others could be next in an extensive rebuilding project, although it is too early to tell. But multiple sources said Wednesday afternoon that the Phillies will trade Rollins to Los Angeles. The deal has not been finalized because a third team is involved in the trade, and money needs to be exchanged among them, which requires approval from the Commissioner’s Office.

“I know that there’s a lot of Jimmy Rollins stuff out there,” Phillies general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. said in the team’s hotel suite at the Winter Meetings. “There’s nothing to announce, and as I’ve said before, we’re keeping our options open and our minds open on any way that we can improve our club long term.”

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Rollins Headed to LA

Phillies Player of the '00s: RollinsJimmy Rollins is looking to be the first piece to fall in the Phillies’ massive rebuilding project.

A source this afternoon said the Phillies are close to trading Rollins to the Los Angeles Dodgers, although the deal has not been finalized. The teams are still discussing parameters of the trade.

CSNPhilly.com first reported Rollins is headed to the Dodgers. FOXSports.com reported a third team could be involved in the deal.

Rollins is the longest tenured professional athlete in Philadelphia. The Phillies selected him in the second round of the 1996 First-Year Player Draft. He made his big-league debut in 2000, won the 2007 National League MVP Award and helped the Phillies win the 2008 World Series. He set the franchise hits record this season, passing Hall of Fame third baseman Mike Schmidt.

The other players involved in the deal are unknown, but one thing is known: Rollins has agreed to waive his 10-and-5 no-trade rights to join the Dodgers.

Rollins had said repeatedly he would not waive his no-trade rights, although the prospect of playing on a losing team almost certainly helped change his mind. The Dodgers have a legitimate chance to win a World Series, and Rollins is from Northern California. He always has enjoyed his trips back to the West Coast.

Saying Bye to Icons Take Guts, Could Be Right Call

Cole HamelsCole Hamels answered numerous questions about the future following yesterday’s season finale at Citizens Bank Park.

He had several interesting things to say, including the fact he hopes to remain in Philadelphia, but he will not hold a grudge if he is traded. Hamels has said a player has a limited amount of prime years in his career, and he would rather spend them winning than losing. Hamels acknowledged the fact the Phillies appear to be a long way from winning again, which is why it sounded like he would not stand in their way if they want to trade him to a team on his limited no-trade list.

He also made a good point when somebody asked him about organizations like the Cardinals and their ability to retool year after year.

“They had Albert Pujols for a while and they got rid of him,” he said.

The Phillies have finally acknowledged they held on too long to the belief they could win with the 2008 World Series championship core, if they simply surrounded it with complimentary players. But will they take the next step? Will they move on from an iconic player or two, if the right situation presents itself in the offseason?

I understand the difficulty in doing that, but I do not believe an organization should grip tightly to its iconic players because it is worried about alienating its fan base. How many fewer fans would the Phillies have drawn this season, if they had traded somebody like Chase Utley, Jimmy Rollins, Ryan Howard or Hamels before the season? The team drew 2,423,852 fans, a nearly 20 percent drop from last season and its lowest season total since its final year at Veterans Stadium in 2003, when they drew 2,259,948. Fans love their heroes, but they love winning more. Organizations, not just the Phillies, must stomach the short-term backlash of trading, releasing or not resigning an icon for the long-term benefit of winning.

I can relate to one example as a native Wisconsinite, which SI.com’s Peter King wrote about last month. Green Bay Packers general manager Ted Thompson drafted Aaron Rodgers in the first round in his first draft as GM in 2005. Rodgers sat on the bench for three seasons, and after Packers icon Brett Favre lost the NFC championship game at home in the 2007 season, Thompson decided he needed to move on from the aging quarterback. Favre initially helped when he retired, but then he unretired and wanted his job back as the Packers’ starting quarterback.

But Thompson essentially told one of the most popular players in NFL history, “No, we’re moving on. We’re not giving you your job back. Good bye.”

Fans went crazy. They hated Thompson. Hated him.

But then a funny thing happened. Rodgers played well and led the Packers to the Super Bowl championship in 2010, while Favre got old and finally retired for good. You can’t find too many fans who still hate Thompson for the decision to move on from the iconic Favre. Because in the end, no matter how much fans love a player, they really love winning. Thompson believed he could no longer win with Favre, so moved on. He stuck to his beliefs, weathered the storm and was proven correct.

I am not advocating dumping players just for the sake of dumping them. They should always be moves that make sense from a baseball perspective. But organizations must not be afraid to move on from a popular player because of the possible marketing or ticket sales implications. If unpopular changes are made, but they lead to winning in the future, the fans will return. They always do, and they always forget why they were so mad at the team in the first place.

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Rollins Talks Season, Phillies’ Future

Jimmy Rollins, Mike SchmidtJimmy Rollins has been recovering from a strained left hamstring for more than two weeks, and there is no reason to rush him back at this point.

Not with five games remaining in the 2014 season.

“Would it be wise?” Rollins said Wednesday afternoon at Marlins Park. “It would not be wise.”

But if Rollins is finished for the season he can pack up his things Sunday knowing he rebounded from arguably the worst season of his career. He had a career-low .667 OPS in 2013, but bumped up that number to .717. He also hit .243 with 22 doubles, four triples, 17 home runs, 55 RBIs, 28 stolen bases and a career-high 64 walks in 609 plate appearances.

He ranked ninth among 25 qualifying shortstops with a .716 OPS, which made him one of the more productive shortstops in baseball.

“I don’t know what the overall grade would be, but you’re never doing enough if you’re not winning,” Rollins said. “Ultimately, that’s how we grade ourselves as athletes. Yeah, I did great, but I didn’t really help us win too many games. That’s how you feel. Even if you did everything you could. Nobody is going to be perfect. Leaving that runner on third those five times, that could have been five wins because we lost by one or something. Things like that. I always look to improve. So you’re never satisfied.”

Rollins will become the dean of everyday shortstops following Derek Jeter’s retirement. Jeter is 40. Rollins turns 36 in November. The next oldest qualifying shortstop is White Sox shortstop Alexei Ramirez, who just turned 33.

Rollins will make $11 million in the final year of his contract with the Phillies. It could be his final season in Philadelphia, but as much as he would like the Phillies to be competitive next season he said he does not know if that is possible.

“It could be next year,” he said. “It could be two, three years. That’s what’s so great about being a ballplayer. We get to write that story. Always have. You put it on paper. You make it official. But we get to write it.”

Rollins said his feelings have not changed about his desire to remain in the Philadelphia. It is possible the Phillies will try to trade him in the offseason, but Rollins has complete no-trade rights and will have the final say.

“I’m still here,” he said. “I’ll be here next year.”

But the Phillies could say, “Jimmy, we’d like to trade you to a contender.”

“And they could say, ‘Guess who we’re signing? We want you to be a part of this,’” Rollins replied.

Cuban outfielder Yasmany Tomas could be that type of player. He could fetch $100 million or more on the open market. He is projected as a middle-of-the-order bat.

“We have enough money to (compete),” Rollins said. “So you can’t say we don’t we have the money to make improvements in the places that need to be improved, or where they can make them, whichever is the priority. We’re in a big market, so. A big market payroll. So you have to go out there and make it happen.”

Communication Breakdown with Ryno?

Ryne SandbergIt certainly looks and feels like Ryne Sandberg has a problem percolating in the Phillies’ clubhouse.

Cole Hamels became the latest player to express his frustrations about Sandberg, when he pulled Hamels from Tuesday’s game in the eighth inning. Hamels looked disgusted as Sandberg approached and handed him the ball as he walked off the mound. Hamels made a point after the game to sidestep questions about Sandberg.

Sandberg recently met with Domonic Brown and David Buchanan following comments they made regarding playing time. A week earlier in San Francisco, he met with Kyle Kendrick after he nearly left the mound before Sandberg could remove him from a game. Sandberg had closed-door meetings with Ryan Howard last month following his announcement he wanted to see others play more at first base, saying he could not care less about Howard’s salary because he wanted to win games. Sandberg benched Jimmy Rollins in Spring Training, but ruffled feathers when he offered a “no comment” when asked about Rollins’ energy and influence in the clubhouse.

“I just deal with it and have conversations,” Sandberg said Wednesday.

Does he feel he has a good handle on the clubhouse?

“Yes,” he said. “Yeah.”

But sources said some players are frustrated, either with how Sandberg handles the game or how he handles players. Of course, much of this has to do with losing. Problems fade on winning teams. They fester and grow on losing ones.

So is there a good or bad relationship between players and manager?

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Rollins Vests $11 Million Option Tonight

Jimmy RollinsJimmy Rollins said he had not paid much attention to the $11 million countdown, but then he is a baseball player who already has made more than $80 million in his career.

He also received a friendly reminder.

“Today is the big day,” a longtime friend texted Rollins today.

Rollins essentially will have next season’s $11 million club option automatically vest tonight following his second plate appearance against the Diamondbacks at Citizens Bank Park. Rollins needed 1,100 plate appearances in 2013-14 or 600 plate appearances this season for the option to vest. He hits the 1,100th mark with 666 plate appearances last season and 434 this season.

“It’s just like the hits record,” Rollins said. “If you’re out there it’s just going to happen. When? Who knows? But it’s going to happen. It’s nothing I was focused on.”

Of course, Rollins must finish the season healthy. If he finishes the season on the disabled list and a mutually agreed upon doctor says he will not be ready by Opening Day 2015, the option does not vest. But in that case, Rollins still could pick up a $5 million player option or the Phillies could pick up an $8 million club option.

But assuming Rollins remains healthy, the option turns his contract from a three-year, $33 million deal into a four-year, $44 million deal. Rollins always considered the contract a four-year deal from the beginning. He had 625 or more plate appearances in 12 of the previous 13 seasons, so hitting the 1,100 mark was not a problem.

“I’ve been here so long,” Rollins said about the team’s mindset in the plate appearances clause. “Just go out there be healthy and play. If you play we know you’re going to be able to help us win. We’ll make it attainable. We won’t make your stretch yourself out and do things to put your career in jeopardy. Just be healthy.”

Phillies React to Papelbon’s Trade Comments

Chase Utley, Jimmy RollinsJonathan Papelbon seemed baffled last night when reporters asked if he hopes to join a contending team before the July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline.

“Some guys want to stay on a losing team?” he said. “That’s mind-boggling to me.”

Chase Utley and Jimmy Rollins are two long-time Phillies who have said in recent weeks they have no desire to leave Philadelphia. Both have 10-and-5 rights, so they can reject any trade at any time. Utley said nothing this morning at Miller Park when asked about Papelbon’s comments and if anything has changed for him. He shooed away the question with his hands.

Rollins said little more than that.

“Not until I say so,” he said, asked if anything has changed for him. “You don’t have to investigate.”

Ruben Amaro Jr. said he had no problems with Papelbon’s candid comments.

“Every single player on this team should want to play for a winning team,” he said. “Simple as that. … Don’t misconstrue his words. He never said he’s unhappy here. He never said anything like that. He never expressed to me that he’s been unhappy. Why wouldn’t players want to play on a contending team? It’s really rather simple.”

Cole Hamels walked past Amaro in the visitors’ dugout at that moment.

“He wants to play on a winning team,” Amaro said about Hamels. “Why wouldn’t he?”

Amaro said Papelbon has not requested a trade. He would not say if there is much interest in his closer, although he said, “I’m getting calls on people all the time.”

But Papelbon is 10th among 149 qualified relief pitchers in baseball with a 1.24 ERA. His 0.85 WHIP is 15th out of 203. He is 22 of 24 in save opportunities.

He could help a contending team in need of bullpen help.

“It’s not a problem,” Amaro said. “I don’t view it as a problem. I’ve never viewed him as a problem.”

Asked about Papelbon’s bewilderment that anybody would want to stay on a losing team, Rollins said, “Pap is entitled to say whatever he wants to say. And he will. As all of us will. Those who have enough courage to.”

But there has to be many more people in the Phillies’ clubhouse that feel that way. They just don’t want to say it publicly.

“I can’t necessarily agree with that,” Rollins said.

Amaro said the Phillies are open-minded about a lot of things as the Trade Deadline approaches. It could mean eating some of Papelbon’s contract. He is owed about $19.5 million through next season, plus a potential $13 million more in 2016 if an option automatically vests based on games finished.

“Something is probably going to happen,” Rollins said. “No one knows who, what or when obviously. Something is likely going to happen.”

But Rollins figures to be here August 1.

“Probably,” he said.

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