Results tagged ‘ Ken Giles ’

Giles Finishes Fourth for NL ROY

Ken GilesAt least a few people recognized Ken Giles’ stellar rookie season.

He finished fourth Monday in National League Rookie of the Year voting by the Baseball Writers’ Association of America. He received two second-place votes and two third-place votes to finish with eight points, which put him behind Mets pitcher and winner Jacob deGrom (142 points), Reds center fielder Billy Hamilton (92) and Cardinals second baseman Kolten Wong (14 points).

Giles went 3-1 with a 1.18 ERA and one save in 44 appearances following his promotion from Triple-A Lehigh Valley in June. Spending the first two months of the season in Triple-A Lehigh Valley certainly cost him votes, but it is tough to get votes as a relief pitcher, if he is not a closer.

Giles could be closing games for the Phillies as early as next season, if they trade Jonathan Papelbon in the offseason.

But Giles put up some eye-popping and historically impressive numbers in 2014. He allowed 25 hits, 11 walks and struck out 64 in 45 2/3 innings. His 0.79 WHIP is fifth among all rookie relievers since 1914. His 5.82 strikeout-to-walk ratio is sixth, and his 12.61 strikeouts-per-nine innings average is 10th.

Will Giles Get NL Rookie of the Year Votes?

Padres Phillies BaseballIf Ken Giles receives votes for National League Rookie of the Year, he might learn about it during an eight-hour shift at his 40-hour-a-week, minimum wage job at an indoor baseball facility just outside Phoenix.

Giles has spent the past few months throwing 100 mph fastballs and nasty sliders past big-league hitters, but he will spend his third offseason picking up baseballs in batting cages and giving pitching lessons.

“It gets me out of the house,” he said.

Giles, 24, entered Thursday’s series finale against the Marlins at Marlins Park with eye-popping numbers. He is 3-1 with a 1.21 ERA and one save in 43 appearances since his promotion from Triple-A Lehigh Valley in June. He has allowed 24 hits, 11 walks and has struck out 63 in 44 2/3 innings. His 0.78 WHIP is fifth among all rookie relievers since 1914. His 5.73 strikeout-to-walk ratio is seventh and his 12.69 strikeouts-per-nine innings average is 10th.

He would be closing right now, if the Phillies could have traded Jonathan Papelbon.

Giles will not be NL Rookie of the Year. Mets right-hander Jacob deGrom (9-6, 2.63 ERA in 22 starts) is probably the favorite with others like Reds outfielder Billy Hamilton receiving more hype and attention. But voters looking closely at the numbers cannot miss Giles’ statistics.

“That stuff doesn’t really matter to me,” Giles said. “Awards are awards, numbers are numbers. It’s nice to be recognized, but other than that, who cares? Staying up here was my main concern. Do my job and perform. I’ve been waiting to do this since I was four years old. That’s all that matters to me.”

It is hard to believe, but when the Phillies sent Giles to Minor League camp in March he really needed to work on his command, particularly with his slider. It has not been an issue since his promotion.

“I’m sure I shocked a lot of people with how fast I came along,” he said. “I just busted my tail in the offseason to make sure I met those requirements. They were right to send me to the Minors. I had no problem going to Double-A, then Triple-A. It was just a matter of me getting that rhythm and that groove and getting those innings in.”

Giles will enter next Spring Training as a lock to make the bullpen, either as the setup man behind Papelbon or as the presumed closer, if Papelbon finally gets his wish and is dealt. Giles said he is fine either way.

“Pap is our leader,” Giles said. “I think right now he’s the glue of our bullpen. If he comes back next year I think he’ll be the biggest key to our success.”

Giles will head home to Phoenix following Sunday’s season finale against the Braves at Citizens Bank Park. He said he will spend his mornings working out and the afternoons and evenings working at It’s All in the Game Sports Center in Peoria, which is located just behind the Spring Training facilities of the Mariners and Padres.

He gets weekends off.

He is pretty sure he the only Phillies player to work a job in the offseason.

“I just can’t sit in my house all day,” he said. “A lot of my friends go there. My brother (Josh) works there. He’s my boss, actually. I got him the job and he ended up being my boss. But it doesn’t feel like work. It’s just hanging out with a bunch of my friends.”

Giles’ Awkward, Hilarious Address


Before tonight’s game the Phillies honored Cole Hamels, Jake Diekman, Ken Giles and Jonathan Papelbon for last week’s combined no-hitter against the Braves.

They were supposed to stand there and tip their caps to the crowd. That’s it. But Papelbon had other ideas. He led the group behind home plate, where they met Phillies public address announcer Dan Baker. The four stood there for a moment before Papelbon grabbed the mike, beginning the most awkward and awesome 60 seconds of the season.

“I want to thank everybody. Thank the fans,” Papelbon said. “And we have someone here, on behalf of all four of us, that’s going to speak for us.”

Papelbon handed the mike to Giles, who immediately recoiled.

“Really?” Giles said.

Hamels and Diekman started cracking up.

“Well, someone put me on the spot,” Giles said. “That’s all right. Well, thank you everybody for coming and celebrating this great day for us. And, um, I don’t know, what’s, um, I feel really awkward right now. I don’t know what to say. Let’s just out there and, um … let’s play some ball right now!”

Bullpen A Strength In Phillies’ Run

Ken GilesOne of the reasons for the Phillies’ recent success is their bullpen.

During their 7-2 run, the bullpen is 2-0 with a 1.08 ERA, allowing 15 hits, three runs, three walks and striking out 32 batters in 25 innings.

But its success goes back further than nine games. It is 2-0 with a 1.21 ERA in 15 games since June 2, allowing 20 hits, five runs, six walks and striking out 46 in 37 1/3 innings. Its ERA, strikeout-to-walk ratio (7.67), strikeouts per nine innings average (11.09) and WHIP (0.70) are best in baseball in that stretch. It also is 4-2 with a 1.94 ERA in 26 games since May 22, allowing 45 hits, 18 runs, 31 walks and striking out 88 78 2/3 innings. It is first in WHIP (0.97), second in ERA and third in strikeouts per nine innings (10.07) in that stretch.

Here is a look at the individual numbers:

  • Jonathan Papelbon: He blew his second save of the season Monday in Atlanta, but is 2-0 with a 0.67 ERA and 16 saves in 17 opportunities since he blew his first save April 2 in Texas. He has allowed 16 hits, two runs, seven walks and has struck out 23 in 27 innings since.
  • Antonio Bastardo: He has not walked a batter in nine innings this month. In fact, he has allowed just one hit and struck out 10 in those six appearances. He also has a 0.50 ERA in 15 appearances since May 11. He has allowed four hits, one run, nine walks and has struck out 22 in 18 innings in that stretch.
  • Jake Diekman: He has a 2.95 ERA in 20 appearances since the end of April.
  • Justin De Fratus: He has not allowed a run in 11 appearances since being recalled from Triple-A late last month. He has allowed seven hits, two walks and has struck out 13 in 12 innings.
  • Mario Hollands: He has a 2.55 ERA this season, but he has not allowed a run in 14 appearances since May 7. He has allowed seven hits, six walks and has struck out 12 in 12 2/3 innings in that stretch.
  • Ken Giles: Since allowing a home run to the first batter he faced in the big leagues, he has allowed one hit, one walk and has struck out six in 3 1/3 scoreless innings.
  • Ethan Martin: Has only pitched twice since joining the team, and not once since June 7.

 

Giles Finally Makes Phillies Debut

Padres Phillies BaseballKen Giles left the Phillies bullpen, headed down a few steps and walked through the bullpen door before he jogged onto the field for his big-league debut with two outs in the top of the ninth inning today at Citizens Bank Park.

One problem:

“I thought I was going to fall down,” he said following a 7-3 victory over the Padres. “My legs were a little Jell-o-y. I thought I was going to fall down. But once I got to the dirt I was like ‘Oh my god, this it. My dreams are finally coming true.’ Now I’ve got my greatest goal accomplished. … It was breathtaking.”

Fans have been waiting for Giles since April, when he started to light up the scoreboard in Double-A Reading with 100 mph fastballs. He dominated Double-A hitters and pitched with some success in Triple-A.

He didn’t disappoint as his first pitch fastball to Yasmani Grandal flashed 100 mph on the scoreboard, although Pitch f/x data had it at 99.1 mph. His next three pitches were balls and Grandal lofted a 3-1 fastball into the flower boxes in left field for a solo home run.

“That’s a great way to welcome me to the big leagues,” Giles said. “I didn’t think it was going to go out. It looked like a routine fly ball to the warning track to me. Once I saw it, Dom (Domonic Brown) was under it, I just stood behind the mound like I would for an out. Next thing I knew, there was stumbling in the bushes. I was like alright, oh well, on to the next one.”

Giles struck out Alexi Amarista swinging on a 2-2 slider to end the game.

One home run, one strike out.

Giles hopes he is on his way.

“It was fun, it was great,” he said. “Now I’ve showed them what I can do, what I throw, so now it’s just, I got the first one out of the way, now it’s down to business, time to pitch.”

The scoreboard flashed 100 mph twice with fans cheering each time it hit. Giles heard each one.

“How could you not?” he said. “I just go out there and pitch. Whatever it says, it says. I’m not going to try to force it. It’s all natural, you’ve seen it, everybody’s seen it today. No reason to pump 102 or 103. … Everybody’s different on their debut and, unlucky for me I got a home run on mine, but, that’s a great memory, just thinking first at-bat, gave up a home run. Next guy, struck out. It’s just a good story to tell.”

Adams to DL, Giles Called Up

Mike AdamsThe Phillies lost one of their best relief pitchers today when they placed Mike Adams on the disabled list with inflammation in his right rotator cuff.

They called up their best young bullpen arm to replace him.

Right-hander Ken Giles will take Adams’ spot in the Phillies’ bullpen. Giles, who touches 100 mph with his fastball, has been on the minds of fans since he started to put up eye-popping numbers in April with Double-A Reading. He had a 1.20 ERA in 13 appearances with Reading. He struck out 29 and walked five in 15 innings.

He was promoted to Triple-A Lehigh Valley early last month. He posted a 2.63 ERA in 11 appearances, but struck out just nine and walked eight in 13 2/3 innings.

“He’s had some good outings,” Ryne Sandberg said. “He’s the next guy in line for us. We saw him in the spring and his control has been better and he’s made some improvement.”

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Fire Sale Looming

Chase UtleyOn the train to DC this morning I crunched some numbers and came up with a few thoughts about the Phillies, who seem to be headed nowhere fast following a 4-7 homestand, which included their first no-hit loss since 1978 and four losses in five games to the Mets.

The Phillies are 9-17 since they were 15-14 on May 4. It’s the worst record in the National League in that span.

They are 24-31 overall. They were 26-29 at this point last year, when they were on their way to 89 losses.

I’m typically one to preach patience during a 162-game season because it is difficult to draw concrete conclusions about a team a little more than two months into it. I often remind people about the deficits the 2007 and 2008 Phillies overcame to win the National League East: seven down with 17 to play in 2007 and 3 ½ back with 16 to play in 2008. But those teams did at least one thing very, very well. Those teams had the best offense in the National League. They hit the cover off the ball. They also had a very good bullpen down the stretch in 2007 and a great one throughout 2008. They also played good defense.

But the 2014 Phillies don’t do anything well. You can’t say, “This team has fantastic starting pitching, so if they can just add a bullpen arm and get Domonic Brown going they should be OK.”

There are holes everywhere.

*

Brown is hitting .206 with six doubles, one triple, four home runs, 27 RBIs, 15 walks, 36 strikeouts and a .557 OPS through the team’s first 55 games. It reminds me of Pat Burrell’s 2003 season. Burrell’s struggles were a huge story that year. Fans wanted him sent to Triple-A, like Brown. I got emails from people asking about Burrell’s eyesight or other ailments that might be affecting him at the plate. But through 55 games in 2003, Burrell was hitting .204 with 13 doubles, one triple, 10 home runs, 25 RBIs, 31 walks, 64 strikeouts and a .751 OPS. Amazing. Burrell’s OPS was nearly 200 points higher than Brown’s is today.

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Revere’s Ride Can’t Save Phillies

Rockies Phillies Baseball

A few thoughts about last night’s 6-2 loss to the Rockies:

  • Will we ever seen Ben Revere homer again? He finally homered in the 1,466th at-bat of his career. It was the longest homerless stretch to start a career since Frank Taveras went 1,594 at-bats without a homer from 1972-77.
  • Darin Ruf isn’t a savior, but he has warranted additional playing time. Not because he hit a home run last night, but because the Phillies need to try something different in left field and possibly at first base while Domonic Brown is struggling overall and Ryan Howard is struggling against lefties. Brown’s .567 OPS is the sixth lowest out of 169 qualifying hitters in baseball. Putting some historical perspective into it, Brown’s .582 OPS as a left fielder — his overall OPS is lower — would be the fifth lowest out of 558 qualifying left fielders in baseball from 1990-2014. The White Sox’s Alejandro De Aza (.533 OPS in 2014), Seattle’s Mike Felder (.545 in 1993), Seattle’s Brian Hunter (.571 in 1999) and Kansas City’s Chuck Knoblauch (.582 in 2002) are lower. Even if Ruf posts an OPS 50 points lower than his career average of .838, it would still be 221 points higher than what Brown is giving the Phillies right now.
  • The Phillies raved about Jeff Manship‘s performance in Spring Training. But Manship still had a 6.42 ERA in 52 appearances over parts of five big-league seasons, which seemed like a pretty good predictor of the future. Manship has a 7.53 ERA in 15 appearances this season. He has made just two appearances with the Phillies holding a lead, which is not a surprise. He joined the bullpen as a long man/mop-up guy. But he has made nine appearances with the game either tied or the Phillies’ in a deficit of three runs or less. In other words, winnable games. Manship has allowed at least a run in five of those appearances, posting a 13.50 ERA in those games.
  • Ken Giles is 2-0 with a 0.84 ERA in eight appearances with Triple-A. He has allowed five hits, one run, five walks and has struck out seven in 10 1/3 innings. His strikeout rate has plummeted since the promotion from Double-A (17.4 per nine innings to 5.9), while his walks rate has inched upward (3.0 to 4.2). That is not a recipe for success, but Triple-A hitters aren’t squaring up the ball, either. That should tell you something, too. Give the kid a shot. The Phillies have nothing to lose at this point.

Camp Out, Garcia Up

Luis GarciaThe Phillies’ bullpen shuffle continues.

They announced today they have outrighted right-hander Shawn Camp to Triple-A Lehigh Valley. Camp, who had a 5.40 ERA in three appearances after allowing four hits and two runs in 1 2/3 innings last night against Toronto, has the option of becoming a free agent.

Right-hander Luis Garcia has been recalled from Lehigh Valley to take Camp’s place.

Phillies assistant general manager Benny Looper said last week that Garcia was pitching better than anybody in the Triple-A bullpen, which currently includes three pitchers that opened the season with the Phillies: right-handers Brad Lincoln, Justin De Fratus and B.J. Rosenberg. Right-hander Phillippe Aumont and left-handers Jeremy Horst and Cesar Jimenez also have pitched for the Phillies.

Garcia is 2-0 with a 0.00 ERA and six saves in 11 appearances with the IronPigs. In 13 2/3 innings, he has allowed nine hits, one unearned run, four walks and has struck out 13.

Garcia had a 3.73 ERA in 24 appearances last season with the Phillies, but he walked 23 and struck out 23 in 31 1/3 innings.

Right-hander Ethan Martin, who could be a bullpen option at some point, made his second rehab appearance Wednesday with Class A Clearwater. He allowed two hits in one inning. He is recovering from right shoulder and triceps capsule strains.

Double-A closer Ken Giles had a 1.29 ERA in 14 innings. He has allowed eight hits, two earned runs, five walks and has struck out 27. Looper said last week that Giles needs to improve his fastball command – he has thrown too many fastball up in the strike zone – as well as improve his slider. Looper said Giles’ next move likely would be to Triple-A, although he offered no timetable for that.

Bullpen Needs to Step Up, Help on Way?

Jonathan Papelbon,  Cliff LeeThe Phillies have their three best pitchers on the mound this weekend against the Nationals: Cliff Lee, A.J. Burnett and Cole Hamels.

Ryne Sandberg will hand the ball to the bullpen at some point, and it is possible he will do it with a small lead or deficit. If the Phillies have a lead, will the bullpen hold it? If they’re down a run or two, will they keep it close to give the offense a chance to come back and win?

It has been a crap shoot all season.

The Phillies bullpen has a 4.84 ERA, which is the highest mark in the National League and the fourth-highest mark in baseball. It has allowed 1.45 home runs per nine innings, which is the highest mark in baseball.

Jonathan Papelbon has 10 scoreless appearances since blowing a save April 2 in Texas. What has hurt the bullpen has been the ineffectiveness of the young pitchers the organization thought had turned a corner. It has been the story the past two seasons. Pitchers like B.J. Rosenberg, Justin De Fratus, Phillippe Aumont, Jeremy Horst, etc., have pitched well late in the season, but haven’t followed up on that success. Jake Diekman, who remains in the bullpen, has been hurt by the long ball. He has allowed three homers this year, helping him to a 7.30 ERA.

As a result just three of the seven pitchers in the bullpen (Antonio Bastardo, Diekman and Mario Hollands) are homegrown. The others (Papelbon, Mike Adams, Shawn Camp and Jeff Manship) signed as free agents or Minor League free agents.

A lack of homegrown production from the bullpen is not a new thing. From 2004-13, the Phillies have had 15 different relief pitchers throw 50 or more innings in a season with less than a 3.50 ERA. Just four of those relievers were homegrown: Ryan Madson, Brett Myers, Geoff Geary and Bastardo. The others the Phillies acquired in trades (Billy Wagner and Brad Lidge), signed as free agents (Clay Condrey, Jose Contreras, Chad Durbin, Tom Gordon, Chan Ho Park, J.C. Romero and Papelbon), claimed off waivers (Aaron Fultz) or selected in the Rule 5 Draft (David Herndon).

But Phillies fans looking for outside help shouldn’t hold their breath. If a team has a good relief pitcher there is almost zero chance they will trade him in May. But there are unsigned relievers still out there like Ryan Madson, Kevin Gregg and Joel Hanrahan, although there has been some buzz around baseball Madson might not pitch again.

“We’ve had contact with all of those guys,” Ruben Amaro Jr. said. “We’ll see.”

Double-A right-hander Ken Giles is throwing 100 mph and dominating hitters in the Eastern League. He has allowed eight hits, two earned runs, four walks and has struck out 25 in just 13 innings.

“He consistently throws very hard,” assistant general manager of player personnel Benny Looper said. “But there are a couple things he’s working on. One, commanding the fastball low in the strike zone. He’s throwing too many pitches up, belt high, that are hittable in the big leagues. The other thing is commanding his slider. He’s got to have that second pitch. It’s a good pitch and he’s making improvements with it, but he’s got to have a couple pitches he can go to. If big league hitters are sitting on his fastball and it’s thrown belt high they’re going to catch up with it. He’s making great progress. We love his arm and we love where he’s headed. But he’s where he needs to be right now. At some point we’d consider getting him against more veteran lineups like you’d see in Triple-A. That would happen at some point.”

In the meantime, the current relievers need to perform and the ones sent to Triple-A (Rosenerg, De Fratus and Brad Lincoln) need to show enough consistency to warrant a call back.

“It’s trusting their ability because they all have big league talent,” Amaro said. “It’s a matter of putting it together when it’s time to ring the bell.”

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