Results tagged ‘ Pat Gillick ’

J-Roll Talks Sandberg, Middleton, Utley and More

rollinsJimmy Rollins is not feeling especially nostalgic this week at Dodger Stadium.

The Phillies are in town, but they traded him to the Dodgers in December. So those warm and fuzzy feelings about facing his former team?

“I haven’t thought about it, honestly,” Rollins said Monday. “There’s enough going on around here to keep me occupied. It’ll be good to see the guys. Obviously I’ve texted a few of them. A few of them return them right away, some wait a week or two. But, other than that, it’s another baseball game, honestly. Going there will probably be different, but coming here, they’re the team we want to beat.”

Rollins said he is not following his former team too closely, but he certainly knows the Phillies have the worst record in baseball.

“I’m glad to have gotten out when I did,” Rollins said. “But I’m glad to have gotten here. Ruben (Amaro Jr.) and I spoke of where I wanted to go. I said Los Angeles, and they were able to get a deal done. So that helps, it helps a whole bunch, when you go somewhere you want to go if you have to leave as opposed to just wherever you end up.”

Rollins touched on number topics Monday:

Ryne Sandberg quitting midseason. “When you’re not winning things happen like that. It’s unfortunate that had to happen that way, no one wants to see a manager get halfway through the season and walk away for any reason other than health issues, but that wasn’t the case. Pete Mackanin, who is a jokester, he’s probably changed the clubhouse over there a little bit.”

Owner John Middleton, who emerged as a face of the organization last week. “He’s a great man. I enjoyed John. Obviously you guys know his fire and his passion. And all he wants to do is win. I’ve always said if there can be another (George) Steinbrenner, it’ll probably be him. He wants to do whatever it takes to win. Him stepping forward doesn’t surprise (me). I think it’s a place where he’s always wanted to be. But with the group over there, I think they need to vote on those things. So when they’ve given him the nod, or if he’s been given the nod, he’ll be front and center doing what he needs to do to make the team better.”

On Chase Utley’s struggles. “I text Chase. He’s one of the guys that hits you back in a couple of weeks. He’s sounds like he’s in good spirits. Obviously what’s happened on the field, no one has expected that. No one is going to be pleased with that, especially Chase. You know how hard he goes at it and what he expects of himself. I know he’s had to deal with a few injuries. But we also know Chase, unless something is going to fall off, he’s not going to say much, he’s going to try to play through it. Starting with his ankle, it’s hard to hit on one foot. We saw that for a few years with Ryan (Howard), now Chase is going through the same thing. Other than that, Chase seems to be the same old guy when we text. Talking about LA traffic, where I’m living, things like that.”

On being anxious for his return to Philly next month: “No. You guys know me. I’m not really anxious to do anything. It’s one day at a time, and whoever’s in front of us is who we play that night. Whatever’s going to happen, what it’s going to be like, as the time draws near, I’ll probably be more excited about it. I know I have a lot of family members going up there. My mom and dad. My mom. Gigi, said, ‘We’re coming up for that game.’ That’s going to be fun. It’s a place I spent my whole career with the exception of this year. I was there since I was 17 in the organization. It will be fun and exciting.”

On if he’s surprised the Phillies are this bad. “There’s enough here to think about, going every day here, to concern myself with (it), honestly. Pat Gillick said they wouldn’t be a competitive team for a couple of years. I know when we were there he said that and we did our best to prove him wrong and the next year we were right there in the playoffs, finally broke through two years later won a championship. I remember him saying that. I thought he was up to his old tricks again, inspiring the boys. That hasn’t happened so far. Maybe he was right. Maybe he was being honest that with what they have and what they are going to eventually have in the farm system, they might not be competitive for a couple years.”

On Cole Hamels possibly being traded to the Dodgers. “That would be nice. That would be nice. Cole would be close to home. We know what type of pitcher he is, especially in big games. He wants those games. You have two big-game pitchers that are already here, so that would be three, and that’s one heck of a combination.”

On if he plans to play next year and beyond. “Yeah. I’ve just got to hit a little better. That’s it. The other parts are there. The second half I have to go out there and prove that I can still swing the bat.”

All-Star Papelbon Is Ready to Be Traded

Jonathan PapelbonIf the Phillies handle July the way everybody in baseball expects them to handle it, Jonathan Papelbon will make one of his final appearances in a Phillies uniform next week at the All-Star Game in Cincinnati.

He is the Phillies’ lone All-Star, based on strong numbers for a closer (1.65 ERA, 14 saves in 31 appearances) despite pitching for a team on pace to lose 108 games.

“I think every one of them is special,” Papelbon said today about his sixth All-Star appearance. “I think the best part about this one is my kids are a little bit older. I’ll be able to let them go … and let them experience it and let them kind of be able to remember it more. That will be pretty cool for me.”

The Phillies are expected to trade Papelbon before the July 31 Trade Deadline. Depending on who is talking either the Phillies are asking way too much for Papelbon or teams are trying to low ball them. Either way, Papelbon hopes to be pitching for a contender by Aug. 1.

“I would be surprised,” Papelbon said, asked about being with the Phillies next month. “Yeah, that would be a pretty valid answer.”

Would he be disappointed?

“Yeah, yeah,” he said. “I would say so.”

Papelbon has a limited no-trade clause, but he reiterated it will not be an issue.

“Any team that wants me I’m willing to go to,” he said. “I just think for me there are no doors closed right now.”

Except for teams that don’t want him to close. Papelbon still has no interest in being a setup man.

Papelbon has a $13 million club option for next season that automatically vests if he finishes 48 games this season. He already has finished 28, so he should reach that number. But Papelbon could require the option to be picked up to facilitate a trade. He only said his agents will handle that.

Papelbon’s salary has been an issue in trade talks, although the Phillies have said they are willing to eat salary to get the right prospects in return.

“The front office knows where my heart is and where my mind is,” Papelbon said. “And that’s to be with a contending ball club. The ball is in the Phillies’ court, the front office’s court, or I should say Andy MacPhail’s court? I haven’t had the opportunity to speak with Andy. I wish I could have. And I would still like to speak with him. But for some reason that hasn’t been made possible for me.”

Of course, MacPhail isn’t officially calling the shots yet.

“Well, then Pat (Gillick) knows where I stand and Ruben (Amaro Jr.) knows exactly where I stand,” he said. “I think everybody knows where I’m at. I’ve always been straight forward that I want to go play for a contender and I’m not going to shy away from it. I feel like that’s my right and my prerogative to have that opportunity and, you know, it’s in their hands. The ball’s in their court. I guess that’s kind of it.”

Your MacPhail Fix

We are entering a new era of Phillies baseball.

That should have become clear the second the Phillies issued a press release yesterday morning announcing ownership partner John Middleton would introduce Andy MacPhail as the next team president. It is the first time an ownership partner got in front of the cameras and microphones and discussed the team. In the past, it has been Bill Giles, David Montgomery or Pat Gillick. Never a Middleton. Never a Buck. Never a Betz.

Nobody.

But that has changed now and it will be fascinating to see how it unfolds. Middleton promised not to be involved in baseball decisions, but clearly he is exerting more influence on the direction of the organization. MacPhail will be interesting to watch, too. He is going to advise Gillick through the rest of the season, but while Gillick will have final say until then, I’ve got to think MacPhail will have more influence than everybody is letting on. For example, what happens if MacPhail loves a deal on the table for Cole Hamels, but Gillick does not? Who wins there?

“I would be very surprised if it ever got to the point where you had diametrically opposed opinions,” MacPhail said. “I think they’re going to insist and ensure that you’ll be involved. And you’re going to learn how that process took place and you’re going to learn who had influence. You’ll also get an opportunity to see just how much information was collected. how exhaustive the research was. So all of those things are going to be important. And again, I’ll give my opinion. That’s one thing I’ve never been shy about doing. It’s gotten me in trouble occasionally.”

Here are the stories from yesterday:

Utley’s Playing Time to Begin Dwindling?

Chase UtleyChase Utley did not play today at Citizens Bank Park.

It was the fourth time in seven games he had not started at second base, although in two of those games he served as the Phillies’ first baseman and designated hitter. Utley’s playing time is being monitored closely these days because he is hitting .182 with a .539 OPS in 244 plate appearances through June 21.

Utley has a $15 million club option for 2016 that automatically vests if he reaches 500 plate appearances this season.

He has 91 games to attain the remaining 256.

Utley declined to discuss his future with the Phillies or his option this morning at Citizens Bank Park, but Ryne Sandberg said after a 9-2 victory over the Cardinals that he would like to see Cesar Hernandez play more in the future.

“I’ve been trying to get him in there,” Sandberg said. “He does a nice job so going forward … wait and see.”

“I definitely feel like I could be the second baseman of the future and I’m trying to take advantage of the opportunity I am getting right now,” Hernandez said through translator Juan Samuel.

Asked about Utley’s future with the organization, Phillies president Pat Gillick said today, “Chase probably is disappointed in his performance to this point. I think he’s a little bit frustrated with his performance. I think maybe we just have to wait and see. Unfortunately, he got off to a bad start in Spring Training with his sprained ankle. But right now he’s not performing up to his standards and certainly we can’t be satisfied with what he’s doing, either.”

But would it be negligent for the organization to have Utley reach the 500-plate appearance mark if he continues to struggle? Utley is hitting .217 with 19 doubles, four triples, 10 home runs, 70 RBIs and a .617 OPS in 602 plate appearances over 150 games in the last calendar year.

“That’s up to the manager,” Gillick said about Utley’s playing time. “We don’t have anything to say about that.”

Really?!

Ruben (Amaro Jr.) to my knowledge and myself, we’ve never dictated to any of the managers their lineup,” Gillick insisted. “They’re free to make their lineup and play whomever they wish.”

If that is truly the case, then it seems Sandberg is already on his way to playing Hernandez more in the future.

But like Sandberg and Gillick said, wait and see.

Q&A with Pat Gillick

Pat Gillick, Charlie Manuel, Rich DubeePhillies president Pat Gillick spoke recently with MLB.com about a variety of topics.

Click here to see the story and video.

Here is an extended version of the Q&A:

Question: So for fans thinking about coming to the ballpark this year, what’s your sell?
Gillick: It’s going to be a little bit different. I think what I think is going to be exciting about it is the fact that we’re going to have some new young players on the field. As we’ve talked here in Spring Training, we had a core of players, the Rollins’, the Utleys, the Howards, Pat Burrell, etc., we’re trying to develop a new core. I think it’s exciting to see these young players develop. We think many of them will develop. There will be some that won’t develop. But again, I think it will be an interesting, energetic, energy filled club that we’re going to put on the field. I’m not saying we’re going to win every game and we’re going to have a challenge probably scoring runs, but I think it’s going to be a team that’s going to go out and certainly try to win every game.

Question: From what you’ve seen this spring, do you think the rebuild if further away than you anticipated, closer or still in that 2017-18 window?
Gillick: I think it’s probably somewhere in that window. We’ve had some good acquisitions, I think. Some of the trades that Ruben (Amaro Jr.) made over the winter have brought us some good pitching talent. We were fortunate enough to pick up two or three other people along the way. We don’t know if it’s going to work out, but certainly (Andy) Oliver and (Odubel) Herrera and (Elvis) Araujo, we’ve picked up in addition to the players we acquired in the (Jimmy) Rollins deal and the (Marlon) Byrd deal. They all look like they’re going to be in Phillies uniforms at some point.

Question: How do you assess the rebuilding process to date?
Gillick: The one thing that we really have to concentrate on is more bats and more position players. The players that we’ve received back in the different deals that we’ve made and the drafts we’ve made it’s more pitching. Pitching and defense are very important, but at the same time we’re going to have to score some runs. I think the next wave that we have hopefully it’ll bring us some position players.

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Could DH come to NL? Gillick Hopes Not

Pat Gillick, Charlie Manuel, Rich DubeeCould the National League adopt the designated hitter in the near future?

The Collective Bargaining Agreement expires following the 2016 season, and MLBPA president Tony Clark said recently the idea has been mentioned to the union. It does not seem to be a pressing issue, but Phillies president Pat Gillick hopes the DH remains in the American League.

“There’s nothing imminent,” Clark said this morning at Bright House Field, where the union held its annual meeting with the Phillies. “There’s nothing going on. I don’t know how that snowball got rolling down hill. This wasn’t anything that’s been discussed. This was something that was mentioned elsewhere. At the end of the day we will go to the players and will determine – if it’s actually proposed — whether or not it’s a consideration the guys want to make, and then we’ll have our bargaining position.”

Scoring in baseball is down, so including the DH in the NL could boost offense. It also would create more high-paying jobs for veteran hitters.

“I’ve been in both leagues,” Gillick said. “Basically, I like the National League style of play. Some people might say, well, that’s an old guy’s way to look at it. But I think it’s a little more intellectual. I think one thing right now that’s pretty prominent is pace of game. And the American League, those New York games, those Boston games, they’re still probably playing them right now. They’re so long. The pace of game, which is an issue, the American League games are longer than the National League games.

“So I would not be one that would be a proponent of the DH in the National League.”

Told that the DH in the NL could increase scoring, Gillick said, “To be frank, I’d rather see them lower the mound and take some of the advantage away from the pitchers and try to improve scoring that way. I just like the intellectual game.”

Clark steered clear of saying whether or not the DH in the NL makes sense.

“There could be an argument for it. There could be an argument against it,” he said. “We’re not going to take a position one way or the other. I will tell you though that each time we’ve had a bargaining session, the DH has been a part of the conversation. What do you want to do? Do you want to eliminate it? Do you want to add it? So it’s been part of the conversation. But as I stand here today I haven’t even begun to ask guys, ‘Hey, what are you thinking about this?’”

Ownership Looking Closely at Amaro

Ruben Amaro, Jr.Phillies chairman David Montgomery hired Ruben Amaro Jr. as Pat Gillick’s replacement as general manager in 2008.

Amaro’s contract expires at the end of the year, and his status is unclear following a pair of 89-loss seasons, including a last place finish in the National League East in 2014, despite a franchise-record $180 million payroll. Montgomery and Gillick have expressed their support for Amaro, but Montgomery acknowledged today on MLB Network Radio on Sirius XM that the Phillies’ ownership group is watching closely and a collective decision will be made about Amaro’s future.

“We think we have a pretty quality guy in that role,” Montgomery said. “At the same time, I have a partnership group … they are looking at this closely as well. The reality is that we have a GM that we think is effective. We have a Hall of Fame GM in our midst as well. If Pat spends an entire year or two close with Ruben, I think he’ll have a very good idea to how effective Ruben is and collectively a decision will be made.”

Amaro has traded Jimmy Rollins, Marlon Byrd and Antonio Bastardo this offseason as the team rebuilds for the future. Gillick has said the team will not be competitive until 2017 or 2018, but signs of improvement at the big-league level and encouraging progress from the team’s prospects could help Amaro’s cause.

Montgomery Back as Chairman, Gillick Remains President

Pat Gillick, left, along with David Montgomery, right, survey Citizens Bank Park on Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2005 in Philadelphia. Gillick just replaced Ed Wade, who was fired after failing to get the team into the playoffs during eight years on the job. (AP Photo/Bradley C Bower)

Pat Gillick, left, along with David Montgomery, right, survey Citizens Bank Park on Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2005 in Philadelphia. Gillick just replaced Ed Wade, who was fired after failing to get the team into the playoffs during eight years on the job. (AP Photo/Bradley C Bower)

The Phillies announced significant changes to their leadership this afternoon.

They said David Montgomery will rejoin the franchise as team chairman, not as team president, the role he had held since 1997. Montgomery took a medical leave of absence in August following jaw bone cancer surgery in May. Pat Gillick replaced Montgomery as interim president, but the team removed the interim tag. Gillick said he will serve as president as long as ownership wants him.

Bill Giles has moved from chairman to chairman emeritus.

“This is the best of all worlds for me,” Montgomery said in a telephone interview today. “The more that we talked about things, the conversation became less about when I return and more about in what capacity. The job I had was a little time consuming. I have the opportunity to maybe not have to be here every morning by nine. If there was a (Great Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce) meeting at 7:30 in the morning and there was a night game, I’d work from 7:30 to midnight. Everybody was asking me if I was prepared to do that for another year or two.”

The Phillies said Montgomery, 68, will “remain active in Philadelphia civic, business, sports, and charitable endeavors, and also will maintain his close association with Phillies fans, customers, and sponsors. He will continue to be very involved in Major League Baseball committees and projects.” He will not be involved in the Phillies’ daily baseball operations.

Gillick will continue to run baseball operations while senior vice president of administration and operations Mike Stiles will run the business side. Gillick initiated a complete rebuilding effort in August, when he assumed control of the team. The Phillies have lost 89 games in consecutive seasons and just finished in last place in the National League East for the first time since 2000, despite a franchise-record $180 million payroll last year.

Today’s announcement ended months of speculation about the Phillies’ future at the top. Montgomery said in November he expected to return as president, but he also acknowledged he alone could not make that happen.

“It’s not entirely my call,” he said then.

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Reports: Papelbon Could Go to Brewers

Jonathan PapelbonJonathan Papelbon sat in front of his locker at Miller Park in July and discussed his future with the Phillies.

“Some guys want to stay on a losing team?” he said, expressing a desire to be traded. “That’s mind-boggling to me.”

Yahoo! Sports reported today that the Phillies and Brewers have been in serious discussions about sending Papelbon to Milwaukee – the same place he expressed his desire to be traded — although it will not be easy. Papelbon has a limited no-trade clause and reportedly can block a trade to Milwaukee, although it is highly unlikely he would if given the choice. He also makes $13 million this season and has a 2016 club option worth $13 million that automatically vests if he finishes 48 games this season.

Papelbon is likely to ask a team to pick up the club option before he waives his no-trade rights, although getting the option to automatically vest should not be an issue if he stays healthy. He has finished no fewer than 52 games each of the previous eight seasons, and has averaged 56.4 games finished in that span.

But the prospect of spending another season in Philadelphia might be enough for Papelbon to accept a trade. The Phillies are trading their veterans and said they are unlikely to contend again for another three seasons. It is worth noting similar reports surfaced about Roy Oswalt in 2010, saying he absolutely would not accept a trade to Philadelphia unless the Phillies picked up his 2012 club option. But in the end, faced with spending another season in Houston or getting a shot at a World Series in Philadelphia, Oswalt waived his no-trade rights without the option being picked up.

Papelbon vigorously shook his head no in July when asked if his no-trade clause would be an issue in facilitating a trade.

But the Phillies and Brewers still would have to agree upon how much salary the Phillies would eat and the prospects the Phillies would receive in return.

The Brewers finished 82-80 last season, six games behind the Giants and Pirates for a National League Wild Card berth. The Brewers just traded Yovani Gallardo to the Rangers, but are looking for backend bullpen help.

Papelbon would help a contender. He went 2-3 with a 2.04 ERA and 39 saves in 43 opportunities last season. His 90.7 save completion percentage ranked sixth out of 29 qualifying closers in baseball. His 0.90 WHIP ranked 19th out of 185 qualifying relief pitchers.

His velocity has declined in recent seasons, but last season he learned how to pitch more effectively without it.

Of course, it is believed one reason Papelbon has been difficult to trade is the perception he is a problem in the clubhouse. Major League Baseball suspended him seven games in September after he grabbed his crotch after a blowing a save in Philadelphia. He also has been critical of the Phillies’ front office and coaching staff, although the team’s young relievers have said he has been a positive influence in their development.

“I think there’s a couple clubs out there that could use somebody to close,” Phillies interim president Pat Gillick said this week. “Ruben (Amaro Jr.) has talked to some people. Maybe something will materialize. But the guy has saved 120 games in three years. His record speaks for itself.”

And the notion Papelbon can be difficult?

“I hate to say Pap is Pap,” Gillick said, “but he’s a competitor who likes to win. He goes out there day in and day out. I don’t think at any time this season or during the time we’ve had him that he’s begged out of a situation. Relievers as a group are a little quirky. They’re a little different.”

A Restless Ryno

Ryne SandbergRyne Sandberg is restless.

He uttered the word “anxious” a few times this afternoon at the Manchester Grand Hyatt, where Major League Baseball is holding its Winter Meetings. He is entering his second full season as Phillies manager and the team is in the beginning stages of a massive rebuild.

He is waiting like everybody else to see who exactly will be in the Phillies’ clubhouse in Spring Training.

“The goal of the organization is to get younger,” Sandberg said. “That is what this winter is all about.”

But there is another reason to be anxious. Managers are frequent casualties in rebuilds. Sandberg is signed through 2016 with a club option for 2017, but Phillies interim president Pat Gillick said the Phillies are unlikely to contend until 2017 at the earliest.

“Well, you know, he said probably might not contend,” Sandberg said.

But is he concerned he will be allowed to see the rebuild to completion?

“Well, I’d say after last year that this is the necessary thing to do is to get young and get more athletic,” he said, evading the question. “I think that helps in defense. That helps in scoring runs. It also starts to form a new core group. So with that being necessary and being a part of that, I’m excited about that possibility of seeing that started.”

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