Results tagged ‘ Ruben Amaro Jr. ’

Phillies React to Amaro Leaving

Amaro_TWRyan Howard has watched the final few pieces of the 2008 World Series championship team chipped away over the past nine months.

Ruben Amaro Jr. became the latest casualty today, when the team announced he will not return as general manager. Amaro served as Pat Gillick’s assistant in 2008. He joins Jimmy Rollins, Chase Utley and Cole Hamels, who were traded in the organization’s rebuilding effort.

“There’s me and Chooch,” Howard said, referring to teammate Carlos Ruiz. “That’s about it. When you come up and you have success with guys – you understand the business aspect of it, you understand things come to an end – but when you’re able to play along Chase Utley or Jimmy Rollins or Cole Hamels on a regular basis and build what you’ve been able to build here, yeah, it’s sad to see certain guys go. But at the same time, we understand that’s what happens in the game.

“It’s kind of the same conversation we’ve been having all year. Guys coming and going and all that kind of stuff. Unfortunately, that’s part of the business sometimes. He’s been here since the beginning for me. I wish (Amaro) the best of luck. I appreciate the opportunities that were given to me.”

Scott Proefrock served as Amaro’s assistant general manager since November 2008. He will be interim general manager until Phillies president Andy MacPhail hires a replacement. Proefrock took the news hard, as many in the front office did.

“I was stunned,” he said. “I was surprised the change was made. I know we got a late start on the rebuilding process, but I think we were headed in the right direction. I think we are headed in the right direction. I think we’ve made some positive moves and helped put talent back in the system and a lot of good things are happening in the Minor Leagues. We won three regular season championships in the Minor Leagues.

“Ruben is as much a friend as he was my boss and I owe him a lot. This is not the way I would have liked something like this to happen, but I owe it to the organization to continue what we’ve started in the rebuilding process and keep it going as long as they want me to and go from there.”

MacPhail made a point in his news conference to mention that the first words from Amaro’s mouth when he was told he would not return was to ask about the fate of the people who served underneath him.

“It doesn’t surprise me knowing Ruben and the type of person he is that that would be his first concern,” Proefrock said. “I’ve worked in five different organizations and this is by far the best organization I’ve ever worked in. The way they treat their people, the family atmosphere. I hope I work in this organization for the rest of my career because there’s no place better that I’ve experienced in the game. And I know Ruben was a big part of that.”

Said Phillies interim manager Pete Mackanin: “I consider Ruben a friend and it’s a sad day to see him go. I’m not worried about his future in baseball. He is a very talented baseball guy and he’s going to rebound and end up somewhere else, a job that he wants.”

Clock Ticking on Phillies? No, Says Amaro

Ruben Amaro, Jr.The clock is ticking on the Phillies with the July 31 Trade Deadline just around the corner.

But Ruben Amaro Jr. said this afternoon at Dodger Stadium that the organization is not feeling pressured to trade anybody. Of course, that might be posturing on his part, but he said the Phillies will not be forced into a trade.

“If it’s going to do something to help our club long term, yes,” Amaro said. “But do we need to do something? I don’t think so.”

Amaro paused for a moment.

“I would like to do something,” he said.

Of course, he would. The Phillies are on pace to lose 109 games and trading Cole Hamels, Jonathan Papelbon and other veterans could kick the organization’s rebuilding efforts into a different gear. But depending on who is talking, either the Phillies are making unreasonable demands for their players, or contending teams are offering mid-range prospects for one of the top starting pitchers and top closers in baseball.

“We’ve debated here internally about when is the greatest value of some of these players, a number of them,” said Amaro, indicating the Phillies could wait to trade until the offseason. “When does that player become the most valuable asset? Again, a lot of it depends on who’s going to step up, and who’s going to satisfy some of the things that we’re trying to do in a trade. If someone does, and we feel like it’s the right thing to do, we’ll do it. If not then we won’t.”

So are they being lowballed?

“They have their evaluations on our players,” Amaro said. “I don’t think it’s an issue of lowballing. I think it’s an issue of, like when we were in a buyers mode, trying to figure out what’s best for the organization. What’s best for each one of those organizations. They have to value what they want and how they want to proceed. That’s really up to them.”

Cesar’s Time: Utley Is No Longer No. 1 Second Baseman

Chase UtleyChase Utley is the greatest second baseman in Phillies history, but it appears Cesar Hernandez’s time has come.

Hernandez, 25, entered tonight’s game against the Dodgers hitting .302 (54-for-179) with 10 doubles, one triple, one home run, 19 RBIs and a .771 OPS in 71 games. Meanwhile, Utley is on the disabled list with an injured right ankle. He is hitting .179 (39-for-218) with seven doubles, one triple, four home runs, 25 RBIs and a .532 OPS in 65 games.

But is the iconic Utley, 36, still the primary second baseman when he returns from the DL?

“Not for me he’s not,” Ruben Amaro Jr. said. “Cesar Hernandez is our best second baseman.”

So whenever Utley returns …

“I would assume that Cesar will be our second baseman,” Amaro said. “Chase’s situation will kind of dictate itself, how he feels. There’ll be time for him to play, I think. He could play some first base. He could play some second. But as far as I’m concerned, just like what our plan has been for a long, long time, that’s to give opportunities to young men who could be part of our future. Cesar Hernandez has been one of our best players on the field right now in a variety of ways.”

Not surprisingly, Utley had little reaction about Amaro’s comments.

“Well, I think Cesar has done a really good job,” Utley said. “There you go.”

Pete Mackanin seems to be on board with Amaro. Asked for a health update on Utley before the game, Mackanin said, “I haven’t heard a word. But with Cesar playing so well, it’s not really a big deal for the simple reason that Utley has not played and seen pitching, so when he does come back … you really can’t count on him. How long has it been? Two weeks. And by the time he starts taking BP and all of that stuff, it’s probably going to be a month before he comes back in and then what do you do? I don’t know.”

Utley’s ankle has improved since a cortisone injection. He could begin baseball activities before the end of the road trip.

He also said recently he could be back on the field before the end of the month.

Nola Won’t Pitch Saturday, But He’s Coming Soon

nolaThe Phillies need a starting pitcher Saturday at AT&T Park in San Francisco, but it will not be Triple-A right-hander Aaron Nola.

But it sure sounds like Nola will be in the big leagues before the end of the month.

“He’s getting closer,” Ruben Amaro Jr. said this afternoon at Dodger Stadium. “At some point after the All-Star break, yeah.”

Of course, that could mean anytime between July 17 and the end of the regular season, but Phillies interim manager Pete Mackanin said he expects more changes to the rotation following the All-Star break. That could mean injured right-handers Jerome Williams and Aaron Harang rejoin the team, but with Cole Hamels expected to be traded before the July 31 Trade Deadline it almost certainly means Nola, too.

“We have a plan in place, and we’ll execute it,” Amaro said. “We have a good thought about when he’s going to be pitching for us.”

The Phillies outrighted right-hander Sean O’Sullivan following last night’s 10-7 loss to the Dodgers at Dodger Stadium. They recalled right-hander Hector Neris to take his place on the roster. Neris will help in the bullpen until Saturday, when the Phillies need to add a starter.

Triple-A Lehigh Valley right-hander David Buchanan is the smart bet. He got pulled after three innings and 40 pitches Tuesday, which means he could pitch Saturday. Amaro said they also are considering options outside the organization.

“We haven’t made a final decision on it,” Amaro said. “It’s time for us to turn it over.”

The Phillies also designated right-hander Kevin Correia for assignment. Rookie right-hander Severino Gonzalez will pitch in his place Thursday. Of course, Gonzalez has not exactly pitched well. He is 3-2 with an 8.28 ERA in six starts. He has not pitched more than 5 1/3 innings in any of those starts. The inability to pitch six or more innings has been a big problem for the rotation.

“I would rather give the young man an opportunity,” Amaro said, explaining the difference between Correia and Gonzalez. “He’s throwing better. His stuff’s better. I’d rather give the young man an opportunity to do it at this stage of the game and see how he fares.”

“It’s time to do something. It’s past (time),” Mackanin said. “We’re happy about getting something changed, I am at least. We got a fresh arm in the bullpen which is huge. I don’t like to keep starters on the field longer than they should, but we’ve bene forced to do that. So we’ll see. Hopefully we’ll get Williams healthy and Harang healthy. Now Seve. There probably will be more changes down the road. So down the road, just get through the All-Star break and regroup, start over.”

All-Star Papelbon Is Ready to Be Traded

Jonathan PapelbonIf the Phillies handle July the way everybody in baseball expects them to handle it, Jonathan Papelbon will make one of his final appearances in a Phillies uniform next week at the All-Star Game in Cincinnati.

He is the Phillies’ lone All-Star, based on strong numbers for a closer (1.65 ERA, 14 saves in 31 appearances) despite pitching for a team on pace to lose 108 games.

“I think every one of them is special,” Papelbon said today about his sixth All-Star appearance. “I think the best part about this one is my kids are a little bit older. I’ll be able to let them go … and let them experience it and let them kind of be able to remember it more. That will be pretty cool for me.”

The Phillies are expected to trade Papelbon before the July 31 Trade Deadline. Depending on who is talking either the Phillies are asking way too much for Papelbon or teams are trying to low ball them. Either way, Papelbon hopes to be pitching for a contender by Aug. 1.

“I would be surprised,” Papelbon said, asked about being with the Phillies next month. “Yeah, that would be a pretty valid answer.”

Would he be disappointed?

“Yeah, yeah,” he said. “I would say so.”

Papelbon has a limited no-trade clause, but he reiterated it will not be an issue.

“Any team that wants me I’m willing to go to,” he said. “I just think for me there are no doors closed right now.”

Except for teams that don’t want him to close. Papelbon still has no interest in being a setup man.

Papelbon has a $13 million club option for next season that automatically vests if he finishes 48 games this season. He already has finished 28, so he should reach that number. But Papelbon could require the option to be picked up to facilitate a trade. He only said his agents will handle that.

Papelbon’s salary has been an issue in trade talks, although the Phillies have said they are willing to eat salary to get the right prospects in return.

“The front office knows where my heart is and where my mind is,” Papelbon said. “And that’s to be with a contending ball club. The ball is in the Phillies’ court, the front office’s court, or I should say Andy MacPhail’s court? I haven’t had the opportunity to speak with Andy. I wish I could have. And I would still like to speak with him. But for some reason that hasn’t been made possible for me.”

Of course, MacPhail isn’t officially calling the shots yet.

“Well, then Pat (Gillick) knows where I stand and Ruben (Amaro Jr.) knows exactly where I stand,” he said. “I think everybody knows where I’m at. I’ve always been straight forward that I want to go play for a contender and I’m not going to shy away from it. I feel like that’s my right and my prerogative to have that opportunity and, you know, it’s in their hands. The ball’s in their court. I guess that’s kind of it.”

Rollins Trade Looking Good for Phillies

eflinThe Phillies only truly began their rebuilding process in December, when they traded Jimmy Rollins to the Dodgers for a pair of Minor League pitchers.

The move proved symbolic because the organization finally cut ties with one of its iconic players.

“It absolutely was the right thing for us to do,” Ruben Amaro Jr. said yesterday at Turner Field. “We’ll continue to try to do those types of deals that’ll help bring some talent into our system and afford opportunities for young players like Freddy Galvis, Cesar Hernandez and Maikel Franco.”

The early returns for the Phillies are positive. Rollins entered tonight’s series opener against the Phillies at Dodgers Stadium hitting .208 with 10 doubles, one triple, seven home runs, 24 RBIs and a .585 OPS, which ranked 161st out of 164 qualified hitters in baseball. Meanwhile, Double-A Reading right-hander Zach Eflin, whom they acquired in the deal, is 5-4 with a 2.88 ERA in 14 starts. Reading left-hander Tom Windle, whom they also acquired, just moved to the bullpen after struggling as a starter, but the Phillies think his arm will play big there.

“We’re very pleased. I’m very happy with it,” Amaro said. “Eflin has a chance to be one of, if not the best, one of the best pitching prospects we have in our organization. Right now, (Aaron) Nola is the guy that people are focusing on, but Eflin has a chance to have every bit as high a ceiling.

“Windle has a strong arm. His command wasn’t really good enough to be a starter at this stage of his career, but we think throwing him in the pen gives him a faster track to the big leagues. There’s great value in those guys that can throw in the mid to upper 90s from the left side.”

Nola remains the closest pitching prospect to the big leagues, especially with the rotation consistently struggling to pitch six innings. It would not be a surprise to see him with the Phillies before the end of the month.

“He’s close,” Amaro said. “He’s still working on some things. He struggled through a couple of games. He hasn’t necessarily been knocked around, but it hasn’t been easy for him. He’s still learning some things and dealing with more veteran hitters in Triple-A, which is a good test for him. I don’t think he’s that far away, but when he’s ready he’ll be here. Just because our rotation is very poor right now it doesn’t mean we’re going to bring him to the big leagues for that reason. We’re going to bring him when it’s time for him developmentally.”

Trade: Phillies Add Cash for International Signings

It is not Cole Hamels, Jonathan Papelbon or Ben Revere, but the Phillies made a trade today.

They acquired the No. 1 overall signing slot ($3,590,400) for the 2015-16 international signing period from Arizona for Class A Lakewood right-hander Chris Oliver, Class A Lakewood left-hander Josh Taylor and the team’s No. 9 overall signing slot ($1,352,100). The trade allows the Phillies to sign 16-year-old outfielder Jhailyn Ortiz and avoid penalties that would prohibit them from signing international players for more than $300,000 until the 2018-19 signing period.

“We’re trying to do some things internationally for this signing period,” Ruben Amaro Jr. said at Turner Field. “Clearly, that’s important to us for a variety of reasons. One, for today. And also for tomorrow. I think it was important for us not to curtail (our) ability to continue to add prospects.”

The Phillies entered the international signing period Thursday with an allotted $3,041,700 to sign international players, but the trade boosts that figure to $4,562,550 because teams can only acquire 50 percent of their international bonus pool. Sources told that the Phillies and Ortiz have agreed to a bonus near $4.2 million.

This trade allows the Phillies to sign Ortiz and others, including Venezuelan catcher Rafael Marchan, and not incur a penalty.

Teams that exceed their pool by 15 percent or more are not allowed to sign a player for more than $300,000 during the next two signing periods, in addition to paying a 100 percent tax on the pool overage. That Phillies would have blown past that percentage without the trade.

The D-backs, Angels, Rays, Red Sox and Yankees exceeded the 2014-15 pool by at least 15 percent, and cannot sign any pool-eligible players for more than $300,000 until the 2017-18 signing period.

“This keeps our hands untied, so to speak,” Amaro said.

Amaro said he hopes the Phillies can finalize something with Ortiz in the next couple weeks.

The Phillies selected Oliver in the fourth round of the 2014 First-Year Player Draft. He went 4-5 with a 4.04 in 13 starts with Lakewood. The Phillies signed Taylor as an amateur free agent in August. He is 4-5 with a 4.61 ERA in 13 starts.

Your MacPhail Fix

We are entering a new era of Phillies baseball.

That should have become clear the second the Phillies issued a press release yesterday morning announcing ownership partner John Middleton would introduce Andy MacPhail as the next team president. It is the first time an ownership partner got in front of the cameras and microphones and discussed the team. In the past, it has been Bill Giles, David Montgomery or Pat Gillick. Never a Middleton. Never a Buck. Never a Betz.


But that has changed now and it will be fascinating to see how it unfolds. Middleton promised not to be involved in baseball decisions, but clearly he is exerting more influence on the direction of the organization. MacPhail will be interesting to watch, too. He is going to advise Gillick through the rest of the season, but while Gillick will have final say until then, I’ve got to think MacPhail will have more influence than everybody is letting on. For example, what happens if MacPhail loves a deal on the table for Cole Hamels, but Gillick does not? Who wins there?

“I would be very surprised if it ever got to the point where you had diametrically opposed opinions,” MacPhail said. “I think they’re going to insist and ensure that you’ll be involved. And you’re going to learn how that process took place and you’re going to learn who had influence. You’ll also get an opportunity to see just how much information was collected. how exhaustive the research was. So all of those things are going to be important. And again, I’ll give my opinion. That’s one thing I’ve never been shy about doing. It’s gotten me in trouble occasionally.”

Here are the stories from yesterday:

MacPhail Arrival Becomes Official Today

macphailA critical piece to the Phillies’ future will be introduced this afternoon at Citizens Bank Park.

Phillies ownership partner John Middleton and president Pat Gillick will introduce Andy MacPhail at a 2:30 p.m. press conference, where he is expected to succeed Gillick. MacPhail is assuming control of the organization at a significant time, with the Phillies holding the worst record in baseball and trying to rebuild for postseason contention in a few years.

MacPhail will play a vital role in the potential trades of veterans Cole Hamels, Jonathan Papelbon, Aaron Harang and others before the July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline.

He also will decide the fate of general manager Ruben Amaro Jr., whose contract expires at the end of the season. Amaro is expected to remain GM for the foreseeable future.

Ryne Sandberg resigned as Phillies manager on Friday, leaving Pete Mackanin as interim manager. The Phillies only have said Mackanin will serve in that role through the homestand, which ends Thursday, probably because they did not want to announce anything official until MacPhail’s introduction.

MacPhail has experience leading three organizations.

He served as Twins general manager when Minnesota won the 1987 and 1991 World Series. He served as Cubs president from 1994-2006, helping the Cubs reach the postseason twice. He then served five seasons as Baltimore’s president of baseball operations, making some of the trades that helped the Orioles return to the postseason.

Hamels Scratched from Friday’s Start

Cole HamelsThis isn’t the news the Phillies needed.

They announced this afternoon that Cole Hamels has been scratched from tomorrow night’s start against the Cardinals because of a mild right hamstring strain. Triple-A right-hander Phillippe Aumont will start in his place.

Hamels is 5-5 with a 2.96 ERA in 14 starts this season, but his health is critical as the July 31 Trade Deadline approaches. Phillies general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. said yesterday he is hopeful the Phillies can make some trades to speed up the team’s rebuilding process. Hamels is the team’s most valuable piece, so they must hope the injury does not linger and Hamels returns to the rotation shortly.

A roster move will be made prior to Friday’s game to accommodate Aumont on the 25-man and 40-man rosters.


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