Results tagged ‘ trade deadline ’

Dodgers in the Lead for Hamels?

Hamels_IGEven before Phillies ace Cole Hamels pitched a no-hitter Saturday against the Cubs, trade discussions between Philadelphia and multiple postseason contenders had escalated.

Hamels’ dominant performance at Wrigley Field certainly has not slowed those talks.

Several sources have told MLB.com that the Dodgers and Rangers lead the race to acquire Hamels, with the Rangers privately bracing themselves to finish second. The Yankees, Giants and Cubs have been the other three teams most actively pursuing Hamels.

The Dodgers are willing to deal, but they are expected to hold onto shortstop Corey Seager and left-hander Julio Urias, who MLBPipeline.com considers the fourth and fifth-best prospects in baseball. Right-hander Grant Holmes ranks 75th overall and right-hander Jose De Leon ranks 89th, but the Phillies need power bats. Dodgers outfield prospects Alex Verdugo and Scott Schebler have power potential. The Dodgers also have a couple catchers in their system that could interest Philadelphia.

Perhaps the Phillies and Dodgers get creative again. They included the Padres last December to help facilitate the Jimmy Rollins deal.

Of course, the Rangers still have a shot because the Phillies like their farm system. Texas is becoming more comfortable at the prospect of taking on Hamels’ remaining salary, which pays him $22.5 million through 2018, plus a $6 million buyout on a $20 million club option for 2019. Texas catching prospect Jorge Alfaro and outfield prospect Nomar Mazara, who rank 34th and 42nd overall, could be part of a package for Hamels. Both have power.

Sources said no deal is imminent, but with five days remaining there is plenty of time to make something happen.

The feeling around baseball is Hamels finally will be dealt.

But will anybody else from the Phillies?

The Cubs, Blue Jays and Nationals have been pursuing Phillies closer Jonathan Papelbon. Philadelphia almost certainly will have to eat some of Papelbon’s salary to get a prospect it desires. That is the reality of the game these days. The more money a team pays, the better the prospects they receive.

Ben Revere, Jeff Francoeur and, perhaps surprisingly, Chase Utley have been receiving interest. The Angels still like Revere, and they are monitoring Utley’s return from an ankle injury. But if Utley is traded, it likely would be a waiver trade next month because he still sits on the disabled list.

Papelbon: ‘Trade Me’ or Get Off the Pot

Philadelphia Phillies pitcher Jonathan Papelbon (58) adjusts his cap after giving up a two-run double to New York Yankees Garrett Jones during the ninth inning of a baseball game, Monday, June 22, 2015, in New York. The Phillies won 11-8. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

Philadelphia Phillies pitcher Jonathan Papelbon (58) adjusts his cap after giving up a two-run double to New York Yankees Garrett Jones during the ninth inning of a baseball game, Monday, June 22, 2015, in New York. The Phillies won 11-8. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

MLB.com’s Anthony DiComo is covering the Phillies this week at the All-Star Game in Cincinnati, which means he is covering Jonathan Papelbon.

Papelbon made it very clear today he wants to be traded to a contender ASAP.

DiComo has the story:

CINCINNATI – Vocal and effusive about his desire to be traded, Phillies closer Jonathan Papelbon spent his sixth All-Star media day trumpeting his desire to move on from Philadelphia.

“I want to go to a contender,” said Papelbon, the Phillies’ lone representative at the 2015 All-Star Game. “I do want to get out of Philly but I need to make a smart decision. I’ll make a decision that’s best for me to go to a place to contend to win a championship. That’s basically what my whole decision is going to be based on.”

In many ways, the decision is not Papelbon’s to make. The Phillies have been trying to deal their closer since before the 2013 Trade Deadline, but so far have been unable to find a suitable match. Making $13 million this season, Papelbon owns a $13 million club option for 2016 that automatically vests if he finishes 48 games. He’s on pace to do that, going 14-for-14 in save situations with a 1.60 ERA.

Papelbon cannot negotiate his own trade. But he can veto deals with a partial no-trade clause, and has said he would do so to avoid moving to a setup role or a non-contending team.

Other than that, Papelbon said, would like to part ways from the 29-62 Phillies, baseball’s worst team by a significant margin.

“This isn’t what I signed up for,” said Papelbon, who left the Red Sox for a four-year, $50-million deal with the Phillies before the 2012 season. “I signed up on a team that won 102 games, and was expecting certain things. Now, it didn’t happen, and I tried to ride that ship as much as I can. I’ve tried to keep my mouth shut as much as I can. But it’s time to you-know-what or get off the pot.

“I feel like three years is plenty enough time to ‘ride it out,’ so to speak. If fans can’t understand it, I can’t really side with them on that. I’m getting older and I don’t know how many more years I have left in this game. I don’t know how many All-Star Games I have left. None of that’s guaranteed. For me, I’m just trying to be on a winning ballclub and win as many rings as I can before it’s all said and done, and I’m coaching [son] Gunner in Little League. That’s really all I’m trying to do.

“From my perspective, I don’t understand how a fan couldn’t understand that. I understand that they wear their hearts on their sleeves and all that stuff, but for me, I’m in it to compete and to win. And I don’t have that opportunity in this organization. And I also feel like I gave this organization as many opportunities as they can to put a winning ballclub out there and as many chances to keep me in this organization, and it just hasn’t happened.”

If Papelbon has his way, a trade is what will happen — and soon. For him, his sixth All-Star appearance is simply continued validation that he can be more useful elsewhere.

“I thought that I was going to come to Philadelphia and win two more rings,” Papelbon said. “I honestly and truthfully did. And then the downward spiral happened, and it happened so quick. It’s almost unexplainable.”

Clock Ticking on Phillies? No, Says Amaro

Ruben Amaro, Jr.The clock is ticking on the Phillies with the July 31 Trade Deadline just around the corner.

But Ruben Amaro Jr. said this afternoon at Dodger Stadium that the organization is not feeling pressured to trade anybody. Of course, that might be posturing on his part, but he said the Phillies will not be forced into a trade.

“If it’s going to do something to help our club long term, yes,” Amaro said. “But do we need to do something? I don’t think so.”

Amaro paused for a moment.

“I would like to do something,” he said.

Of course, he would. The Phillies are on pace to lose 109 games and trading Cole Hamels, Jonathan Papelbon and other veterans could kick the organization’s rebuilding efforts into a different gear. But depending on who is talking, either the Phillies are making unreasonable demands for their players, or contending teams are offering mid-range prospects for one of the top starting pitchers and top closers in baseball.

“We’ve debated here internally about when is the greatest value of some of these players, a number of them,” said Amaro, indicating the Phillies could wait to trade until the offseason. “When does that player become the most valuable asset? Again, a lot of it depends on who’s going to step up, and who’s going to satisfy some of the things that we’re trying to do in a trade. If someone does, and we feel like it’s the right thing to do, we’ll do it. If not then we won’t.”

So are they being lowballed?

“They have their evaluations on our players,” Amaro said. “I don’t think it’s an issue of lowballing. I think it’s an issue of, like when we were in a buyers mode, trying to figure out what’s best for the organization. What’s best for each one of those organizations. They have to value what they want and how they want to proceed. That’s really up to them.”

Hamels: I Will Start Wednesday vs. Yankees

Hamels_IGCole Hamels cleaned out his locker yesterday to prank his teammates, but he made no jokes about his health today.

He said he is fine and he will pitch Wednesday against the Yankees in New York.

“I won’t be on the DL,” he said this afternoon at Citizens Bank Park.

The Phillies scratched Hamels from Friday night’s start against the Cardinals at Citizens Bank Park because of a strained right hamstring. But Hamels said he feels much better, and he said the Phillies scratched his start as “more of a precaution than anything.”

Hamels said he first felt something following Tuesday’s bullpen session.

“It felt like a cramp,” he said. “It was just tight.”

Hamels, who will throw a bullpen session Sunday to test the hamstring, is always in tune with how is body feels, so the fact he wanted to be cautious about his hamstring is no surprise. He certainly did not want to push the issue and tear something. Certainly not now. The July 31 Trade Deadline is just 42 days away. The last thing Hamels need is a serious injury.

But Hamels, who the Phillies are trying to trade, downplayed the proximity of the Trade Deadline to the way he handled the injury.

“My focus is to play on this team and win ballgames, and that’s what I’m trying to do,” he said. “I want to maintain the level of play that I know I’m capable of going out there and doing. And that’s not because of other situations, but it’s because that’s who I am. And what I’ve learned, in the past, with trying to push through certain injuries. There are times when you just want to be smart no matter what the circumstances are. I know they’re a little bit different than previous circumstances in previous years, but I’m not going to change the way I like to play the game and prepare for the game.”

But the Trade Deadline is on his mind. It is why he cleaned out his locker to get teammates and members of the media to think he had been traded during Thursday’s 2-1 victory over the Orioles.

“We’ve kind of bene battling some tough morale, so just something to distract everybody,” he said about the prank. “I think with a lot of them it worked. I think even today they didn’t know what to expect.”

“Cole, glad to see that trade didn’t go through,” closer Jonathan Papelbon said as he walked past Hamels.

Amaro: Other Teams Weren’t Aggressive Enough

Ruben Amaro Jr.The Phillies are headed to their third consecutive season without a winning record and it is clear they need to make changes to have any shot to win in the future. But with a slew of players available to trade to help those efforts they traded nobody before Thursday’s non-waiver Trade Deadline.

Ruben Amaro Jr. kept a stiff upper lip as he spoke to reporters about it Thursday afternoon at Nationals Park.

“Not disappointed,” Amaro said. “More surprised that there wasn’t more aggressive action from the other end. We have some pretty good baseball players here.”

But there seemed to be a clear difference of opinion there. The Phillies look at a roster with Cliff Lee, Jonathan Papelbon, A.J. Burnett, Marlon Byrd, Antonio Bastardo and others and see players that can help contending teams. That might be true, but other teams looked at those players with age, injury or performance concerns often with high price tags attached to them.

“Well, I would disagree with that,” Amaro said, asked if the Phillies overvalued their own players. “In no scenario were we asking for players that were their top prospects. We were not looking for exorbitant paybacks, so to speak, we were looking for players that would help us, but I think we were very reasonable in the discussions that we had.

“I think one of the most over-coveted elements of baseball are prospects. I don’t know how many prospects that have been dealt over the last several years have really come to bite people in the ass.”

Amaro said he sensed teams believed the Phillies were desperate to deal and ultimately would cave to their demands.

“I’ve made it very, very clear that we didn’t have any pressure to make deals,” he said. “What our goal was to try and make our club better. So if there’s a deal to help us get there, we would’ve done it. There really wasn’t a deal we felt comfortable with or a deal that we were going to acquire talent that was compensatory to the talent.”

(more…)

Papelbon Doesn’t Get His Wish

Jonathan PapelbonJonathan Papelbon practically begged to be traded to a contender before Thursday’s non-waiver Trade Deadline, but he did not get his wish.

It was not a surprise. He signed a four-year, $50 million contract before the 2012 season and that contract almost certainly prevented the Phillies from dealing him. He is owed $13 million next season with a $13 million club option that automatically vests based on 55 games finished next season or 100 games finished in 2014-15.

“It’s not my decision,” Papelbon said, when asked if he wants to stay in Philadelphia. “Whatever happens, happens. I have to do whatever the GM decides to do with me.”

Papelbon has a limited no-trade clause, although he said he would have waived it. But he also said he would not have accepted a trade if he were headed to a team that already has a closer. He has no interest in being a setup man.

“I don’t set up,” he said. “And you should know that.”

Even if it meant a chance to win another World Series?

“The chance to win a World Series is with me closing,” he said. “Period.”

Interestingly, Papelbon said he met recently with Ruben Amaro Jr. about the direction of the team. He said he liked what he heard.

“Ruben had promised me that, going forward, we were still going to compete and, no matter what it took to put a winning product on the field, he was going to do it,” Papelbon said. “If he could trade me and the trade was right for both the Phillies and the other ball club, then a trade could happen. But if it wasn’t right for the Phillies, he wasn’t going to do it. At the same time, he also promised me that we were going to compete year after year and there’s no rebuilding here with the Phillies. So that was a big boost for me.”

But couldn’t those words just be empty promises? Papelbon acknowledged he did not hear an actual plan from Amaro, nor did he ask for one.

“I don’t think Ruben is a person who is just going to say something and then not be able to do it,” Papelbon said. “I think he’s honest in his decision-making, and what he says he goes out and tries to do it.”

Byrd: Players Must Be Open to Change

byrdAlmost everybody in baseball seemed surprised the Phillies could not trade Marlon Byrd before Thursday’s non-waiver Trade Deadline.

Not Byrd.

“It’s been quiet the whole time,” he said Thursday afternoon at Nationals Park. “I haven’t heard from Ruben (Amaro Jr.) or my agents as far as front-running teams that have been close. I wasn’t surprised.”

Byrd is hitting .270 with 20 home runs, 60 RBIs and a .795 OPS. Teams could use a right-handed bat like that. But perhaps some teams backed away from Byrd, 36, because he is owed $8 million next season, plus a potential $8 million more in 2016 if a club option vests based on plate appearances. Byrd also has a limited no-trade clause to four teams, including the Mariners and Royals. He said he would have waived the clause had he been asked.

But now what?

“It goes back to change and figuring out a way to make those wins happen,” Byrd said. “Until then, it’s going to be a long road. We have the guys who want to win because they know how to win. They’ve done it before. We still have that core here. We still have a great pitching staff. We still have Chooch (Carlos Ruiz) behind the plate. So anything can happen next year. We’ll see what happens with offseason trades and stuff like that.”

Byrd still could be traded before the Aug. 31 waiver Trade Deadline or in the offseason. So could other veterans like Cliff Lee, Jonathan Papelbon and A.J. Burnett. But what if things remain the same?

“I know one thing this team has to do is be open for change, whatever it is, to get better,” Byrd said. “I don’t know what it is for guys. For me, the (PED) suspension put me in a position to go to Mexico, but I had to go down there and learn how to play the game again. You have to be dedicated and understand that sometimes there needs to be change in your game, in your lifestyle, wherever it is, to make you better as a player. I knew what I needed and I did it. And it actually worked. We’re creatures of habit, 35 or 36 (years old). You’ve done stuff in this game that has made you successful. Not having that success, we have to change.

“Are you willing to do it? If it’s a guy in the offseason trying to get back into the game, do you go just work out or do you go play the game? A lot of guys talk about it. But you actually have to do it.”

Phillies Quiet As Deadline Approaches

Ruben Amaro Jr.,If anything is going to happen before today’s 4 p.m. trade deadline it is going to happen at the last minute.

But a last-minute deal is tough to imagine.

The Phillies are facing numerous obstacles in trying to trade veterans players like Cliff Lee, Jonathan Papelbon, A.J. Burnett and Marlon Byrd. First, two teams have to agree on players to be exchanged. That is difficult enough to do. Second, the four players I mentioned are owed big-time money following this season. Lee is owed $37.5 million ($52.5 million if a 2016 club option vests). Papelbon is owed $13 million ($26 million if a 2016 club option vests). Burnett could pick up a player option worth $12.75 million, if he makes 32 starts this season. And Byrd is owed $8 million ($16 million if a 2016 club option vests). The money is a big issue for teams, although the Phillies have told teams they are willing to eat money to get the right players in return. But even if the Phillies agree on the players and they money, they still have to work through no-trade clauses, although I believe Lee, Papelbon, Burnett and Byrd would say yes.

Another factor, I believe, is teams believe the Phillies are desperate to pull the trigger, so they are going to wait for Ruben Amaro Jr. to cave. But sources have said the Phillies are comfortable with holding onto these players and trying again in August before the Aug. 31 waiver trade deadline. And if the Phillies fail to make a deal then, they can still try to trade these guys in the offseason.

Don’t Expect Hamels to Go Anywhere

Cole HamelsDo not expect Cole Hamels to be traded before Thursday’s non-waiver trade deadline.

There has been plenty of speculation recently about his availability, but sources told MLB.com on Tuesday that the Phillies have had no substantive talks with any team about him. That includes the Dodgers. There are multiple reports that the Dodgers and Phillies have been in contact recently, and the Phillies have requested the Dodgers’ top three prospects to make a deal.

But one source said the Phillies have made no such requests because the two teams have not talked that in depth.

The Phillies have made teams aware they would need to be thoroughly impressed to trade Hamels, but talks have never gotten much further than that. Hamels allowed six hits and struck out eight in eight scoreless innings last night against the Mets to improve to 6-5 with a 2.55 ERA. He has a 1.58 ERA (15 earned runs in 85 2/3 innings) in his last 12 starts, entering the night sixth out of 95 qualifying pitchers in ERA since June 1.

A source said the Phillies haven’t gotten particularly close to the finish line in any trade discussions. They have numerous players available, including Cliff Lee, Jonathan Papelbon, Marlon Byrd, A.J. Burnett and Antonio Bastardo, but some teams believe Ruben Amaro Jr. is under pressure to deal and ultimately will sell low to make a trade. They seem to be waiting for Amaro to cave.

But ownership has not ordered Amaro to shed payroll, which does not force his hand. Players like Hamels, Lee, Papelbon, Byrd and other veterans are signed through at least next season, which means Amaro can try to clear them through waivers next month and trade them before the Aug. 31 waiver deadline.

The Phillies can also wait to try to trade them in the offseason.

It seems the Phillies are prepared for that possibility.

It looks like nobody is going anywhere right now, although everything can change with one phone call before Thursday’s Deadline.

Phillies Still Trying to Make A Deal

The Phillies front office has been frustrated lately with its lack of success on the trade market, but it is still trying to complete at least one deal before Thursday’s 4 p.m. non-waiver Trade Deadline.

Ruben Amaro Jr. traveled with the team to New York, where it opened a three-game series tonight against the Mets at Citi Field. But Amaro was nowhere to be found before the game as he continues to call teams to find a trade partner for a group of players that includes right fielder Marlon Byrd and left-hander Antonio Bastardo.

“Am I expecting any (trades)?” Ryne Sandberg said. “I don’t know one way or another. Just from what I hear, if there is (a trade) it’ll be very late in the process.”

Byrd and Bastardo remain the most likely Phillies to be moved, which is nothing new. Byrd is hitting .266 with 20 home runs and 60 RBIs. His 20 homers are tied for eighth among right-handed hitters in baseball, which makes him valuable. Byrd can block trades to four teams, including the Mariners and Royals. He makes $8 million next season and he has an $8 million club option for 2016 that automatically vests with 600 plate appearances in 2015 or 1,100 plate appearances in 2014-15, including 550 plate appearances in 2015, which is a sticking point to some teams.

Left-hander Cole Hamels remains available, but the asking price remains extraordinarily high. This also is nothing new. The Phillies want to keep Hamels because he is the rare Phillies player signed to a mega contract still in his prime, but they will consider trading him if they are absolutely blown away by an offer.

Cliff Lee and Jonathan Papelbon are unlikely to be moved by Thursday, but they could be traded in August if they clear waivers. Lee is owed at least $37.5 million following this season, while Papelbon is owed at least $13 million. A.J. Burnett remains a possibility, but he seems to be a second choice for teams still hoping for a pitcher like David Price, Jon Lester or Hamels. Burnett’s player option could be worth more than $10 million next season. The money owed to Lee, Papelbon and Burnett has made trading them difficult.

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