Results tagged ‘ trade ’

All-Star Papelbon Is Ready to Be Traded

Jonathan PapelbonIf the Phillies handle July the way everybody in baseball expects them to handle it, Jonathan Papelbon will make one of his final appearances in a Phillies uniform next week at the All-Star Game in Cincinnati.

He is the Phillies’ lone All-Star, based on strong numbers for a closer (1.65 ERA, 14 saves in 31 appearances) despite pitching for a team on pace to lose 108 games.

“I think every one of them is special,” Papelbon said today about his sixth All-Star appearance. “I think the best part about this one is my kids are a little bit older. I’ll be able to let them go … and let them experience it and let them kind of be able to remember it more. That will be pretty cool for me.”

The Phillies are expected to trade Papelbon before the July 31 Trade Deadline. Depending on who is talking either the Phillies are asking way too much for Papelbon or teams are trying to low ball them. Either way, Papelbon hopes to be pitching for a contender by Aug. 1.

“I would be surprised,” Papelbon said, asked about being with the Phillies next month. “Yeah, that would be a pretty valid answer.”

Would he be disappointed?

“Yeah, yeah,” he said. “I would say so.”

Papelbon has a limited no-trade clause, but he reiterated it will not be an issue.

“Any team that wants me I’m willing to go to,” he said. “I just think for me there are no doors closed right now.”

Except for teams that don’t want him to close. Papelbon still has no interest in being a setup man.

Papelbon has a $13 million club option for next season that automatically vests if he finishes 48 games this season. He already has finished 28, so he should reach that number. But Papelbon could require the option to be picked up to facilitate a trade. He only said his agents will handle that.

Papelbon’s salary has been an issue in trade talks, although the Phillies have said they are willing to eat salary to get the right prospects in return.

“The front office knows where my heart is and where my mind is,” Papelbon said. “And that’s to be with a contending ball club. The ball is in the Phillies’ court, the front office’s court, or I should say Andy MacPhail’s court? I haven’t had the opportunity to speak with Andy. I wish I could have. And I would still like to speak with him. But for some reason that hasn’t been made possible for me.”

Of course, MacPhail isn’t officially calling the shots yet.

“Well, then Pat (Gillick) knows where I stand and Ruben (Amaro Jr.) knows exactly where I stand,” he said. “I think everybody knows where I’m at. I’ve always been straight forward that I want to go play for a contender and I’m not going to shy away from it. I feel like that’s my right and my prerogative to have that opportunity and, you know, it’s in their hands. The ball’s in their court. I guess that’s kind of it.”

Rollins Trade Looking Good for Phillies

eflinThe Phillies only truly began their rebuilding process in December, when they traded Jimmy Rollins to the Dodgers for a pair of Minor League pitchers.

The move proved symbolic because the organization finally cut ties with one of its iconic players.

“It absolutely was the right thing for us to do,” Ruben Amaro Jr. said yesterday at Turner Field. “We’ll continue to try to do those types of deals that’ll help bring some talent into our system and afford opportunities for young players like Freddy Galvis, Cesar Hernandez and Maikel Franco.”

The early returns for the Phillies are positive. Rollins entered tonight’s series opener against the Phillies at Dodgers Stadium hitting .208 with 10 doubles, one triple, seven home runs, 24 RBIs and a .585 OPS, which ranked 161st out of 164 qualified hitters in baseball. Meanwhile, Double-A Reading right-hander Zach Eflin, whom they acquired in the deal, is 5-4 with a 2.88 ERA in 14 starts. Reading left-hander Tom Windle, whom they also acquired, just moved to the bullpen after struggling as a starter, but the Phillies think his arm will play big there.

“We’re very pleased. I’m very happy with it,” Amaro said. “Eflin has a chance to be one of, if not the best, one of the best pitching prospects we have in our organization. Right now, (Aaron) Nola is the guy that people are focusing on, but Eflin has a chance to have every bit as high a ceiling.

“Windle has a strong arm. His command wasn’t really good enough to be a starter at this stage of his career, but we think throwing him in the pen gives him a faster track to the big leagues. There’s great value in those guys that can throw in the mid to upper 90s from the left side.”

Nola remains the closest pitching prospect to the big leagues, especially with the rotation consistently struggling to pitch six innings. It would not be a surprise to see him with the Phillies before the end of the month.

“He’s close,” Amaro said. “He’s still working on some things. He struggled through a couple of games. He hasn’t necessarily been knocked around, but it hasn’t been easy for him. He’s still learning some things and dealing with more veteran hitters in Triple-A, which is a good test for him. I don’t think he’s that far away, but when he’s ready he’ll be here. Just because our rotation is very poor right now it doesn’t mean we’re going to bring him to the big leagues for that reason. We’re going to bring him when it’s time for him developmentally.”

Trade: Phillies Add Cash for International Signings

It is not Cole Hamels, Jonathan Papelbon or Ben Revere, but the Phillies made a trade today.

They acquired the No. 1 overall signing slot ($3,590,400) for the 2015-16 international signing period from Arizona for Class A Lakewood right-hander Chris Oliver, Class A Lakewood left-hander Josh Taylor and the team’s No. 9 overall signing slot ($1,352,100). The trade allows the Phillies to sign 16-year-old outfielder Jhailyn Ortiz and avoid penalties that would prohibit them from signing international players for more than $300,000 until the 2018-19 signing period.

“We’re trying to do some things internationally for this signing period,” Ruben Amaro Jr. said at Turner Field. “Clearly, that’s important to us for a variety of reasons. One, for today. And also for tomorrow. I think it was important for us not to curtail (our) ability to continue to add prospects.”

The Phillies entered the international signing period Thursday with an allotted $3,041,700 to sign international players, but the trade boosts that figure to $4,562,550 because teams can only acquire 50 percent of their international bonus pool. Sources told MLB.com that the Phillies and Ortiz have agreed to a bonus near $4.2 million.

This trade allows the Phillies to sign Ortiz and others, including Venezuelan catcher Rafael Marchan, and not incur a penalty.

Teams that exceed their pool by 15 percent or more are not allowed to sign a player for more than $300,000 during the next two signing periods, in addition to paying a 100 percent tax on the pool overage. That Phillies would have blown past that percentage without the trade.

The D-backs, Angels, Rays, Red Sox and Yankees exceeded the 2014-15 pool by at least 15 percent, and cannot sign any pool-eligible players for more than $300,000 until the 2017-18 signing period.

“This keeps our hands untied, so to speak,” Amaro said.

Amaro said he hopes the Phillies can finalize something with Ortiz in the next couple weeks.

The Phillies selected Oliver in the fourth round of the 2014 First-Year Player Draft. He went 4-5 with a 4.04 in 13 starts with Lakewood. The Phillies signed Taylor as an amateur free agent in August. He is 4-5 with a 4.61 ERA in 13 starts.

Are Ryno and Hamels on Different Pages?

Cole HamelsRyne Sandberg said yesterday he thinks the Phillies have a “chance to surprise some people.”

But then Cole Hamels told USA Today he wants to win and “I know it’s not going to happen here.”

It sounds like manager and pitcher are not on the same page. But Ruben Amaro Jr. and Sandberg said today they had no problem with Hamels’ comments. How could they? The Phillies front office has said the organization is rebuilding for the future and the process could take at least a couple seasons before the team can be a postseason contender.

“Maybe I would have liked for him to have chosen his words a little differently, but it’s totally understandable,” Amaro said Thursday. “Cole wants to win. I think everyone is on the same page. We all want to win.”

Sandberg said he spoke with Hamels about those words. He said Hamels told him that he made those comments “a while ago and it didn’t reflect on his feelings coming into camp. I think it was unfortunate timing and it wasn’t a reflection on how he feels coming into camp.”

USA Today’s Bob Nightengale wrote Wednesday’s story. He said he interviewed Hamels for the story Tuesday.

Perhaps Hamels completely changed his feelings from Tuesday to Thursday, when Phillies pitchers and catchers held their first workout at Carpenter Complex.

Perhaps Hamels simply does not want to ruffle any feathers.

But Hamels has said numerous times he does not want to spend his prime years on a losing team. He told USA Today his limited no-trade clause would not scuttle a trade to a contender.

“He’s one of those guys that sits in the sweet spot for us,” Amaro said about Hamels. “He’s going to be a tremendous asset if he stays with us, and if we get to the point where we move him, it’s going to be because we get assets back that are going to move us forward. He’s in our camp. I fully expect him to pitch on Opening Day for us. I’m glad to have him. He’s one of the best pitchers in the game and I’m happy to move forward with him and get us going back on track.”

Amaro said he has talked to veterans like Hamels, Jonathan Papelbon and Cliff Lee since they have arrived in camp. Each player has indicated in the past they would like to play for a winning team.

“There’s a lot of talk about us rebuilding and these (veterans) being disgruntled and all of that stuff,” Amaro said. “(But) these guys are all professionals, and they’re going to play and pitch and they’re going to do their best to win baseball games for the Phillies, I’m sure of that.”

Lester Gone, Hamels Talks Heat Up

Cole HamelsPhillies general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. called Jon Lester the linchpin of the offseason.

Well, the pin has been pulled.

The Cubs and Lester have agreed to a six-year, $155 million contract, which means trade discussions regarding Cole Hamels are heating up. The Cubs, Red Sox and Dodgers had been most interested in Hamels, but with the Cubs out of the picture the attention turns to the Red Sox and Dodgers, who have the prospects and wherewithal to take the remaining four years and $96 million on Hamels’ deal.

(Hamels’ contract jumps to five years, $110 million if a 2019 club option automatically vests based on innings pitched.)

A source said the Giants also are taking a run at Hamels. They pursued Lester, but finished third in that sweepstakes.

Ryne Sandberg said yesterday the Phillies would have to be wowed to trade Hamels, which is true to an extent. They are not going to trade Hamels for a crop of mid-level prospects. They cannot make the same mistake they made in 2009, when they traded Cliff Lee to the Mariners for Phillippe Aumont, Tyson Gillies and J.C. Ramirez. The Phillies’ return for Hunter Pence, who they traded to San Francisco in 2012, also has been lackluster.

If the Phillies trade Hamels they have to hit big.

The Dodgers have a couple prospects the Phillies would love to have: infielder Corey Seager (No. 13 in MLB.com’s Top 100 Prospects list) and outfielder Joc Pederson (No. 15). They might be able to pry away one. A source indicated the Dodgers and Phillies could put together a bigger package to improve the Phillies’ return, and that package could include Jimmy Rollins.

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Phillies Like Valentin

valentinThe Phillies hope Jesmuel Valentin is one of two quality players to join the organization following the Roberto Hernandez trade with the Dodgers.

The Phillies acquired him yesterday as the first player to be named in the deal. The Phillies have until the middle of next month to select the second player, which will come from a remaining pool of three players. Ruben Amaro Jr. indicated they are leaning toward a pitcher.

“We have a pretty good idea of who we want but we’re still waiting to make a decision right now,” he said. “We’ll check on some medical stuff. They’re younger guys. For the situation we’re in and the player we gave up, I think we did pretty well. Even if we had just this guy, we’d be happy with it.”

MLB.com ranked Valentin, who is the son of former big leaguer Jose Valentin, as the No. 13 prospect in the Dodgers’ organization. Selected 51st overall as a supplement pick in the 2012 First-Year Player Draft, Valentin was hitting .282 with 22 doubles, nine triples, seven home runs, 47 RBIs and a .785 OPS in 107 games with Great Lakes.

Valentin will report to Class A Clearwater.

“We like the kid,” Amaro said. “He’s got baseball acumen. He’s advanced pretty quickly. He plays short and second; we’ll probably have him play second base for us. Switch hitter. Plays the game well. … We’re not sure if he’s better from the right or from the left side. He doesn’t have a whole lot of Minor-league at bats yet. But he’s all right. He’s someone who handles the bat pretty well. He has a little bit of pop. He’s not a big guy, but has a little pop. He can run. He plays the game right. He plays hard.”

Amaro said there is chance the Phillies could make at least another trade before the Aug. 31 waiver Trade Deadline.

Hernandez to Dodgers for Two PTBNL

Roberto HernandezThe Phillies hoped to contend with Roberto Hernandez as their No. 5 starter, but failing that they hoped to flip him to a contending team for a prospect or two.

They believe they accomplished the latter Thursday, when they traded Hernandez to the Dodgers for two players to be named or cash. The Dodgers, who claimed Hernandez on waivers, will pay the remaining $1.5 million on his one-year, $4.5 million contract.

“The fact we weren’t going to be offering him … a qualifying offer or anything like that, we felt like it was a move to help give us some talent in our system,” Ruben Amaro Jr. said.

The Phillies will select two lower-level Minor League players from a pool of players the Phillies and Dodgers agreed upon. Amaro said they will scout those players the remainder of the Minor League season before making their selections.

“I think they’re going to be guys that are going to be down the line,” he said, referring to younger prospects. “But we have some decent reports on them. And listen, they’re down the line. The further down the line, they’re more of a crapshoot.”

Amaro said last week following the July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline he did not like the talent offered for his veteran players. While Hernandez certainly was not going to land a top prospect, Amaro thinks the Phillies have enough talent to choose from.

But in the Phils’ minds, if they were going to let Hernandez walk at the end of the season, it made sense to roll the dice and take a shot at it. Other teams have had success with players like this in the past. Sign a player that has struggled, have him bounce back and flip him for talent.

Hernandez posted a 3.87 ERA in 23 appearances (20 starts). He had a 4.89 ERA last season with the Rays.

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Reports: Phillies Listening on Lee and Hamels

Cliff LeeInteresting start to the morning …

ESPN and CBSSports.com reported the Phillies have told teams they will listen to offers for Cole Hamels and Cliff Lee. Now why in the world would the Phillies do that? Well, it is important to note that listening is different than trading. But if some team is willing to offer premium talent for Hamels or Lee — and take their entire salary to boot — it would be foolish not to listen.

It would be foolish, however, to trade one of them for a package that does not address numerous and immediate needs. After all, what was the purpose of extending Chase Utley, signing Marlon Byrd and resigning Carlos Ruiz if the Phillies are not trying to win the next couple seasons?

The Phillies better than anybody know the risks of trading a top starting pitcher for young talent. They traded Lee to the Mariners in Dec. 2009 for Phillippe Aumont, Tyson Gillies and J.C. Ramirez. They also have acquired Lee, Roy Halladay and Roy Oswalt for prospects that included Carlos Carrasco, Jason Donald, Lou Marson, Jason Knapp, Kyle Drabek, Travis d’Arnaud, Michael Taylor, J.A. Happ, Jonathan Villar and Anthony Gose.

Have any of those players come back to haunt the Phillies yet?

How certain can the Phillies be that the players they would get in return for Hamels or Lee would make a difference?

(Here are other examples of teams trading top starting pitching and getting very little in return.)

It also must be noted there are obstacles involved in any potential Hamels and Lee talks. First, both have limited no-trade clauses. Second, they are owed a ton of money. Hamels is owed $118.5 million over the next five years, which includes $22.5 million in salary each of the next five seasons, plus a $6 million buyout for a vesting option in 2019. Lee is owed $62.5 million over the next three years, which includes $25 million in salary each of the next two seasons, plus $12.5 million buyout for a vesting option for 2016.

If the Phillies trade either of them the other team must take their salary, which limits potential partners. The Phillies last ate money in a trade in 2005, when they shipped Jim Thome to the White Sox.

There are reasons it makes sense for the Phillies to listen. They have holes everywhere. They need to get younger. They could use the payroll relief. But there are plenty of reasons it won’t happen, too.

Blow It Up? Rollins Knows It Could Happen

Rollins Back at the Top, Halladay Ready to GoJimmy Rollins made his Phillies debut Sept. 18, 2000, when the Phillies stood just 61-86 for the third-worst record in the National League.

Just 15,486 fans watched at Veterans Stadium.

Since then Rollins has helped the Phillies win one World Series, two National League pennants and five National League East championships. He won the 2007 NL MVP Award, four Gold Gloves and made three All-Star teams. But as the Phillies’ record sat at 19-22 following yesterday’s loss to the Indians, Rollins acknowledged the Phillies need to get going quickly because the reality in front of them is not pretty.

“We’ve just got to make sure we do what we need to do before they blow it up,” he said.

You can bet the rest of Rollins’ teammates understand this. If the Phillies don’t turn this around quickly, Ruben Amaro Jr. could hold a fire sale that would dwarf last season’s trades that included Shane Victorino, Hunter Pence and Joe Blanton. Essentially, these next couple months could be the last time you see the core of Rollins, Chase Utley, Ryan Howard, Carlos Ruiz and Cole Hamels together.

“There’s nothing I can do about it, except play a winning brand of baseball,” Rollins said. “And if we don’t win, it’s up to the guys up top, whether they decide to blow it all up and ship us out.”

Read the entire story here.

Lopez Deal Unlikely

It sure sounded yesterday like the Phillies had found a setup man.

Not so fast.

Sources said today a trade that would have sent right-hander Wilton Lopez to Philadelphia for a pair of Minor League prospects had hit a roadblock and is unlikely to happen. Lopez, 29, had been in Philadelphia on Wednesday for a physical.

A deal had been agreed upon, pending Lopez passing his physical, but it appears both teams are going their separate ways.

Lopez, 29, would have been a nice addition to the Phillies bullpen. He went 6-3 with a 2.17 ERA and 10 saves in 64 games in 2012. He became Houston’s closer following the trade of Brett Myers to the Chicago White Sox and Francisco Cordero‘s ineffectiveness. But he also spent time on the disabled list in each of the previous two seasons with an elbow injury.

The Phillies could pursue another pitcher in a trade, or they could look to the free-agent market. They have liked right-handers Mike Adams and Brandon Lyon in the past.

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